Place in the Neighborhood: Pushed Out, Pushing Back – Latest issue of the Trotter Review available on ScholarWorks

This photograph, from an article by Jen Douglas about gentrification and Jamaica Plain’s Hyde-Jackson Squares, shows Matchstick Man to "symbolize the landlords who burned buildings they found insufficiently profitable in order to collect insurance money" and "Monopoly Man ... proudly admiring his acquisitions with the fires literally behind him.". Photo credit: Diana Shoberg (2004).

This photograph from an article by Jen Douglas about gentrification in Jamaica Plain, shows Matchstick Man to “symbolize the landlords who burned buildings they found insufficiently profitable” and “Monopoly Man … proudly admiring his acquisitions with the fires literally behind him.” Photo credit: Diana Shoberg (2004).

The most recent issue of the Trotter Review, now available on ScholarWorks, explores issues of gentrification and dispossession. As Barbara Lewis, the director of the William Monroe Trotter Institute at the University of Massachusetts Boston, writes in her introduction to this issue of the journal, this issue of the Trotter Review explores “gentrification and its alternate, dispossession, through the lens of housing policy focused on increasing opportunity; as a strategy of neighborhood displacement; as possible collusion between developers, politicians, and members of an African heritage leadership class eager to keep their pockets jingling with gold; and as local examples of ouster and remake of a neighborhood to suit the tastes of a more moneyed population with a creamier complexion.”

The Trotter Review has been published since 1987 by the William Monroe Trotter Institute at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Full issues of the Review are available on ScholarWorks, the open access institutional repository for scholarship and research out of UMass Boston.

Apart from an introduction by Barbara Lewis, the contents of this issue, titled “Place in the Neighborhood: Pushed Out, Pushing Back,” include:

To view the full issue, and to explore back issues of this publication, click here.


ScholarWorks is the University of Massachusetts Boston’s open access institutional repository for scholarship and research. ScholarWorks is a publishing platform, a preservation service, and a showcase for the research and scholarly output of members of the UMass Boston community. ScholarWorks is a service of the Joseph P. Healey Library at UMass Boston.

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Appreciating Difference: Latest issue of the Trotter Review available on ScholarWorks

DeAma Battle, an artistic director and choreographer who has researched Africa-derived dances for decades, performs traditional steps while clad in the garb of her ancestral continent. Her studies and travels have documented steps and movements common to dances done in Africa and different countries in the Diaspora. Photo courtesy of DeAma Battle.

DeAma Battle, artistic director and choreographer. Photo courtesy of DeAma Battle.

The most recent issue of the Trotter Review, now available on ScholarWorks, explores how immigrants from the Caribbean and Africa wrestle with, define and adapt their identity after they arrive in the United States. Original research articles look at Haitian youth, African fathers and the children of Caribbean immigrants.

The Trotter Review has been published since 1987 by the William Monroe Trotter Institute at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Full issues of the Review are available on ScholarWorks, the institutional repository for scholarship and research out of the University.

Apart from an introduction by Barbara Lewis, director of the Trotter Institute, the contents of this issue, titled “Appreciating Difference,” include:

A couple listens during a 2005 meeting of African immigrants with Marina Dimitrijevic, a member of Milwaukee County Board of Supervisors. Courtesy of the office of Marina Dimitrijevic. Reprinted under Creative Commons.

A couple listens during a 2005 meeting of African immigrants with Marina Dimitrijevic, a member of Milwaukee County Board of Supervisors. Courtesy of the office of Marina Dimitrijevic. Reprinted under Creative Commons.

To view the full issue, and to explore back issues of this publication, click here.


ScholarWorks is the University of Massachusetts Boston’s online institutional repository for scholarship and research. ScholarWorks serves as a publishing platform, a preservation service, and a showcase for the research and scholarly output of members of the UMass Boston community. ScholarWorks is a service of the Joseph P. Healey Library at UMass Boston.

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Reclaiming Humanity in and out of the Cell: Latest issue of the Trotter Review available on ScholarWorks

Gary Little, mentor coordinator at Span, Inc., (center) makes a forceful point during a discussion on prisoner reentry issues, held at the Boston Center for the Arts. Other participants, from left, were moderator Andrea Cabral, then sheriff of Suffolk County; Daniel Cordon, director of transitional employment at Haley House; Lyn Levy, founder and executive director of Span, Inc.; and Janet Rodriguez, founding president and CEO of SoHarlem in New York. The panelists spoke from the stage where a play about the trials of reentering society after incarceration was being performed in the fall of 2012. Photo courtesy of Boston Center for the Arts.

The most recent issue of the Trotter Review, which focuses on the impact of incarceration on prisoners and their families after they are released, is now available on ScholarWorks, the open access institutional repository for scholarship and research out of UMass Boston.

The Trotter Review has been published since 1987 by the William Monroe Trotter Institute at UMass Boston.

Apart from an introduction by Barbara Lewis, director of the Trotter Institute at UMass Boston, and the proceedings of a community forum featuring Andrea J. Cabral, Daniel Cordon, Lyn Levy, Gary Little, and Janet Rodriguez, the contents of this issue, titled “Reclaiming Humanity in and out of the Cell,” include:

To view the full issue, and to explore back issues of this publication, click here.


ScholarWorks is the University of Massachusetts Boston’s online, open access institutional repository for scholarship and research. ScholarWorks serves as a publishing platform, a preservation service, and a showcase for the research and scholarly output of members of the UMass Boston community. ScholarWorks is a service of the Joseph P. Healey Library at UMass Boston.

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Gaining Political Ground in the Twenty-First Century: Latest issue of the Trotter Review available

President Barack Obama and Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick

The most recent issue of the Trotter Review, which focuses on issues of the political representation of African Americans in local, state, and national politics, is now available in ScholarWorks, the institutional repository for scholarship and research at UMass Boston.

The Trotter Review has been published since 1987 by the William Monroe Trotter Institute for the Study of Black Culture at UMass Boston.

The contents of this issue include

To view the full issue, and to explore back issues of this publication (which the ScholarWorks team is in the process of posting to the site), click here.

ScholarWorks is the University of Massachusetts Boston’s online, open access institutional repository for scholarship and research. ScholarWorks serves as a publishing platform, a preservation service, and a showcase for the research and scholarly output of members of the UMass Boston community. ScholarWorks is a service of the Joseph P. Healey Library at UMass Boston.

Bookmark and Share