Fall 2020 issue of New England Journal of Public Policy available on ScholarWorks

Cover of the Fall 2020 issue of the New England Journal of Public PolicyThe most recent issue of the New England Journal of Public Policy is now available on ScholarWorks, the open access repository for scholarship and research at UMass Boston.

Describing this issue of the New England Journal of Public Policy, founding editor Padraig O’Malley writes: “Other than ‘The Troubled Backstory of the Twenty-Fifth Amendment,’ articles in this issue of the journal have their origins in presentations at the Centre for the Resolution of Intractable Conflicts conference at Oxford University, September 2019, which addressed themes arising from dual anniversaries—the 150th birthday anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi and the 140th birthday anniversary of Albert Einstein. The presentations covered a wide and disparate geographical spread—with authors from Singapore, Australia, Turkey, the United States, Syria, the United Kingdom, and Belgium, and articles covering Myanmar, Japan, Australia, Turkey and Syria and Europe.”

The New England Journal of Public Policy has been published since 1985 by the John W. McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies at the University of Massachusetts Boston. After folding in 2006 due to financial constraints, the New England Journal of Public Policy resumed publication in 2013 as an online open access journal. Full issues of the entire run of the New England Journal of Public Policy are available on ScholarWorks at UMass Boston, which is managed out of the Joseph P. Healey Library.

Apart from the editor’s note by O’Malley, who is also the John Joseph Moakley Distinguished Professor of Peace and Reconciliation at UMass Boston, this issue includes:

To view the full issue, and to explore past issues of this publication, click here.


ScholarWorks is the University of Massachusetts Boston’s online open access institutional repository for scholarship and research. ScholarWorks serves as a publishing platform, a preservation service, and a showcase for the research and scholarly output of members of the UMass Boston community. ScholarWorks is a service of the Joseph P. Healey Library at UMass Boston.

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Empowering Our Communities Through History: Join us at the 2019 Mass History Conference

Photograph of Lawrence, Mass., strikers.What: 2019 Mass History Conference

When: Monday, June 24, 2019 | 8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Where: Hogan Campus Center, College of Holy Cross, Worcester, Mass.

Click here for directions.

The 2019 Mass History Conference will focus on empowering our communities and organizations in preserving and telling the many stories of the towns and people of Massachusetts. Learn more about the conference here.

Staff from University Archives & Special Collections in the Healey Library at UMass Boston will be presenting as part of two sessions at the 2019 Mass History Conference:

ENGAGING COMMUNITIES WITH PARTICIPATORY RESEARCH: The 1919 Police Strike and Lawrence World War I Memory Projects
Presenters: Jessica Holden, University Archives & Special Collections, Healey Library, UMass Boston, and Marc Laplante, Lawrence WW1 Project Lawrence History CenterModerator: Caroline Littlewood, University Archives & Special Collections, Healey Library, UMass Boston

Learn how communities are engaging residents in their local history through crowd-fueled research and innovative technology. Presenters will share their research models, training MOOC software, and other technology to help others create community-based research projects. The 1919 Boston Police Strike Project documents and preserves the stories of the more than 1,100 police officers who were involved in this highly influential labor strike which had lasting effects in the City of Boston and across the United States. Project team members will provide an overview of the history, structure, and current status of the project; speak to how they have recruited, trained, and retained volunteers; discuss challenges and successes; and examine how this project may serve as a model for other crowd-fueled local history projects. Through his passion and creativity, Marc Laplante tells the stories, and brings to life, the 35 Lawrence residents who received official recognition with a bridge, park, pool, street corner or buildings for their deaths in World War I.

Skills To Go: CRAFTING PHASE BOXES
Presenter
: Meghan Bailey, University Archives & Special Collections, Healey Library, UMass Boston

Help improve access to important archival collections at your repositories. Learn to create custom enclosures, also known as phase boxes, for items in manuscript collections. This is a unique, hands-on opportunity to learn a skill and be exposed to interesting, historic materials from University Archives and Special Collections in the Joseph P. Healey Library at UMass Boston. The types of materials and resulting enclosures will vary greatly in size, age, and format. Training will be provided to participants, and no prior experience is needed. UASC will provide a limited* amount of books in need of enclosures. Instructions will be provided so you may create the enclosures at your institution.

View the full program for the Mass History Conference and register here.


2019 CONFERENCE SUPPORT AND SPONSORSHIPS

Presented by
Massachusetts History Alliance
Mass Humanities

Supported by
Massachusetts State Historical Records Advisory Board (MA SHRAB)
University of Massachusetts Amherst Program in Public History
University of Massachusetts Boston Public History and Archives Tracks
Joseph P. Healey Library at UMass Boston

Supporters: Daedalus, Inc., Museum Textiles Services, Boston Rare Maps

Supporting Members: Dorchester Historical Society, Northeast Document Conservation Services

Supporting Associates: Robert Forrant, Mike Potaski

Contributing Members: Freedom’s Way National Heritage Area, House of the Seven Gables, Waterworks Museum, Digital Commonwealth, Tsongas Industrial History Center, Massachusetts Historical Society

Friends: Epsilon Associates, Inc.; Roberts Consulting; Swift River Press: Public History & Communications by Pleun Bouricius; Lynne Zacek Bassett, Costume & Textile Historian; D.P. Autio, Ornamental Plastering and Plastering of all Types; William G. Pomery Foundation

Donors: University Products


University Archives & Special Collections in the Joseph P. Healey Library at UMass Boston collects materials related to the university’s history, as well as materials that reflect the institution’s urban mission and strong support of community service, notably in collections of records of urban planning, social welfare, social action, alternative movements, community organizations, and local history related to neighboring communities.

University Archives & Special Collections welcomes inquiries from individuals, organizations, and businesses interested in donating materials of an archival nature that that fit within our collecting policy. These include manuscripts, documents, organizational archives, collections of photographs, unique publications, and audio and video media. For more information about donating to University Archives & Special Collections, click here or email library.archives@umb.edu.

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Join us on Saturday, June 15 for discussion of Graffiti Art in Hip-Hop Culture at Grove Hall Branch of the BPL

Flyer for BPL graffiti art event at the Grove Hall branch of the Boston Public LibraryWhat: Element of Graffiti Art in Hip-Hop

When: Saturday, June 15, 2019 | 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Where: Grove Hall Branch of the Boston Public Library, 41 Geneva Avenue, Dorchester, Mass. 02121

Click here for directions.

Boston Public Library, UMass Boston, and members of the hip-hop community invite hip-hop enthusiasts of all ages to attend a free event at the Grove Hall Branch of the Boston Public Library on Saturday, June 15, from 1:00-3:00 p.m.

“Element of Graffiti Art in Hip-Hop” is the final event in a series of hip-hop programs to take place as part of a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Boston-based artists Rob Stull, Problak (Rob Gibbs), and Fabian Murray will lead a conversation and participate in a panel discussion about their identities as graffiti artists and their careers as graphic designers. Collectively, these gentlemen represent over 100 years of artistic expertise. They will be sharing their stories and individual experiences of maneuvering through the intricate world of professional art. An art demonstration will take place following the discussion. Boston is home. Hip-Hop is the foundation.

Learn more about this event and let us know on Facebook if you’re planning to join us. Read more about past programs in this series here.

Logo for National Endownment for the Humanities

This event is presented in partnership through Boston Public Library and the Joseph P. Healey Library at UMass Boston, and made possible by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations in this program do not necessarily express those of the National Endowment of the Humanities.


University Archives & Special Collections in the Joseph P. Healey Library at UMass Boston collects materials related to the university’s history, as well as materials that reflect the institution’s urban mission and strong support of community service, notably in collections of records of urban planning, social welfare, social action, alternative movements, community organizations, and local history related to neighboring communities.

University Archives and Special Collections is working to expand its collections related to hip-hop in Boston and Massachusetts and welcomes donations of archival materials from musicians, DJs, breakdancers, graffiti artists, producers, promoters, and fans that will help document the area’s rich heritage and legacy of hip-hop culture. Click here to learn more about what we collect. For more information about donating to University Archives & Special Collections, click here or email library.archives@umb.edu.

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Introducing Sarah Collins, new Community Archiving Grant Project Manager

Headshot of Sarah CollinsWe are pleased to announce that Sarah Collins joined the University Archives & Special Collections in the Joseph P. Healey Library at UMass Boston as Community Archiving Grant Project Manager.

Sarah comes to UASC most recently from the New England Aquarium where she worked in interpretive planning, exhibit and program evaluation, and visitor experience. She is an experienced strategic planner and collaborative leader; during her time in Washington, DC, Sarah held project manager positions in education policy nonprofits as well as for the Administrative Office of the US Courts.

She will be putting these skills to good use helping to build on the success of the Mass. Memories Road Show. Through a grant from the Institute for Museums and Library Sciences, UASC will create an accessible, adaptable, and engaging “roadmap” to guide libraries of all kinds and sizes through the process of planning event-based participatory archiving programs with the communities they serve. Sarah is thrilled to be helping libraries across the country empower their communities to add their personal stories to the archives.

Sarah received her undergraduate degree in international relations and her master’s degree in museum studies with a concentration in history from the George Washington University.

Welcome to UASC, Sarah!

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Special Issue of New England Journal of Public Policy explores Euro-Mediterranean migrations

Blue cover of New England Journal of Public PolicyThe most recent issue of the New England Journal of Public Policy is now available on ScholarWorks, the open access repository for scholarship and research at UMass Boston. The Special Issue on Migration is guest edited by Emanuela C. Del Re and explores issues of stability and sustainability in Euro-Mediterranean migrations.

In his editor’s note for this issue, New England Journal of Public Policy founder and editor Padraig O’Malley notes that “Emanuela del Re … has assembled contributions from prominent scholars, academics, and researchers from Europe, Africa, and the United States” to explore this issue’s theme.

The New England Journal of Public Policy has been published since 1985 by the John W. McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies at the University of Massachusetts Boston. After folding in 2006 due to financial constraints, the New England Journal of Public Policy resumed publication in 2013 as an online, open access journal. Full issues of the entire run of the New England Journal of Public Policy are available on ScholarWorks.

Apart from Del Re’s introduction and the editor’s note by O’Malley, who is also the John Joseph Moakley Distinguished Professor of Peace and Reconciliation at UMass Boston, this issue includes:

To view the full issue, and to explore back issues of this publication, click here.


ScholarWorks is the University of Massachusetts Boston’s online, open access institutional repository for scholarship and research. ScholarWorks serves as a publishing platform, a preservation service, and a showcase for the research and scholarly output of members of the UMass Boston community. ScholarWorks is a service of the Joseph P. Healey Library at UMass Boston.

Bookmark and Share