McCormack Speaks

October 9, 2017
by McCormack Speaks
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Path-breaking Book on Gender and Multicultural Leadership Earns Carol Hardy-Fanta Career Book Award

woman of color waving American flag McCormack Graduate School Senior Fellow Carol Hardy-Fanta earned the Distinguished Career Book Award from the Race, Ethnicity, and Politics section of the American Political Science Association (APSA) in recognition of her book, Contested Transformation: Race, Gender, and Political Leadership in 21st Century America.Published in 2016 by Cambridge University Press, the book is a pioneering study of racial and ethnic minorities in U.S. politics because women of color are at the center of its analysis.

According to the APSA selection committee, “The book makes an outstanding contribution to knowledge in political science on the intersectional dynamics of power and political representation in the United States. It is a path-breaking work that will benefit scholars and policymakers for many years to come.”

Harvard University scholar Jennifer Hochschild also praised the book. “The study of minority groups’ constricted yet expanding political leadership would be valuable at any time, but at present, it commands our attention as few other topics can do.”

Hardy-Fanta accepted the award at the annual meeting of the APSA in San Francisco earlier this month.

“At the McCormack Graduate School,” said Dean David W. Cash, “we strive to strengthen communities and catalyze change in governance. Carol’s comprehensive research will go a long way to promote a more equitable representation of minority men and women in American politics for generations to come.”

Carol Hardy-Fanta is a nationally recognized scholar on Latina/o politics and has published widely on the intersection of gender, race, and ethnicity in politics and public policy. She is the former director of the Center for Women in Politics and Public Policy at UMass Boston’s McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies, a position she held for more than a decade. Currently a senior fellow, she continues to pursue her own scholarship on gender and multicultural leadership.

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May 11, 2017
by justinmaher
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The Data Behind Romney’s Binders

Mitt Romney

Former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney

 

In Lucia Graves’s recent New Republic piece, Carol Hardy-Fanta, senior fellow at the McCormack Graduate School, sheds light on gender equity in former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney’s administration and those infamous “binders of women.”

Read “Trump is Giving Us a Case of Romnesia” here.

 

 

Carol Hardy-Fanta, McCormack Graduate School

Carol Hardy-Fanta

Carol Hardy-Fanta (PhD, Brandeis University), a senior fellow at UMass Boston’s John W. McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies and former director of the Center for Women in Politics and Public Policy, is the lead author on  the new book, Contested Transformation: Race, Gender, and Political Leadership in 21st Century America, issued recently by Cambridge University Press and coauthored with Pei-te Lien, Dianne Pinderhughes, and Christine Sierra.

February 28, 2017
by McCormack Speaks
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Do legislative staffers deserve a raise, too?

by Christa Kelleher, Research and Policy Director
Center for Women in Politics and Public Policy

MA State House domeNow that Massachusetts legislators have secured increased compensation for themselves, they should take a hard look at the pay levels of those who work for them. Fair and livable wages should be the norm for all workers whether they are employed by private, nonprofit, or public entities. Those who step up into a public service role as a legislative aide, budget analyst, chief of staff, or any of the other positions essential to our representational democracy deserve to be compensated fairly and adequately.

Yet it’s unclear whether this is the case here in Massachusetts. While earnings data are available through Massachusetts Open Checkbook, no titles are provided for employees listed and it’s not possible to systematically examine salaries by position, by legislative office, or by the race, ethnicity, or sex/gender identity of staff members.

There may never be an ideal moment to address the topic of pay for those who work in the Legislature.

Read the full story.

This blog is posted with permission from Mass-INC, publisher of Commonwealth Magazine.

Christa Kelleher, PhD      Research Director, Center for Women in Politics & Public Policy, McCormack Graduate SchoolChrista Kelleher oversees research on women’s public leadership and a range of public policy issues that affect women, with a particular focus on women’s reproductive and maternal health. She specializes in identifying, analyzing, and promoting public policies that improve the conditions of women’s lives; advancing women’s public leadership; state and local policy development

February 1, 2017
by McCormack Speaks
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Equality is a Zero Sum Game

By Edward Henry
An International Relations student at the McCormack Graduate School

human rights

When I was asked to write a piece on my experiences attending the Women’s March, I wanted to write about the festive atmosphere that permeated the march. I wanted to write about arriving downtown early to feel the excitement of the marchers already streaming towards the Common. When I sat down to write, I intended to report the positivity in addition to addressing the critiques of the march. But, the videos and images from the Inauguration Day protests in DC, the police presence in the Boston companion march that night, and the police presence at the Boston Protest against the Muslim Ban led to a change in direction.

The Women’s March was successful in pulling millions worldwide into the streets to stand in support of women’s equality in addition to a host of equality issues. But reporting only that would be repeating the mistakes of previous equality movements. Continue Reading →

January 12, 2017
by justinmaher
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Goodbye, Hello: Reflections on What’s Next for Public Service

by Justin Maher
McCormack Graduate School Dean’s Office

President Obama Delivers Address, 2016Tuesday night, President Obama took the stage to deliver his farewell address. In it, he painted an optimistic portrait of a nation filled with promise and people of all political stripes ready to continue to fight for an inclusive democracy. He also acknowledged that “our political dialogue has become so corrosive that people of good character aren’t even willing to enter into public service.” That frightening proposition, echoed by polls that show the steady and alarming decline of trust in government, deserves serious reflection.

As the assistant dean for academic programs at McCormack, I spend a good chunk of time talking to prospective students investigating graduate school. There are a myriad of reasons why they choose to pursue graduate study. Some are coming from a bachelor’s program and want to continue to specialize in a field they are passionate or curious about. Others are seasoned professionals ready for a career change or new skills. But, in addition to the personal and professional benefits, they are united by a commitment to improving their local and global communities.  Continue Reading →

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