McCormack Speaks

September 26, 2018
by saadiaahmad001
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Latest Book by Mark Warren Chronicles Firsthand Experience of Educators and Students Fighting Systemic Racism in Schools

 

Mark Warren, Professor of Public Policy and Public Affairs at the McCormack Graduate School, recently published his fourth book, Lift Us Up, Don’t Push Us Out!: Voices from the Front Lines of the Educational Justice Movement. The book introduces readers to the struggles and accomplishments of the educational justice movement through firsthand accounts and personal narratives written directly by the parents, students, educators, and allies fighting on the frontlines in the resistance against systemic inequalities that target and disadvantage children of color in low-income households.

Over the course of the semester, he will be speaking with community and education activists featured in the book and touring cities across the country, including Washington, D.C., Chicago, New York City, Philadelphia, and Los Angeles. His speaking schedule can be viewed here. McCormack Speaks sat down with Dr. Warren to learn more about his latest book and some of the goals that he hopes his book will help accomplish on these issues.

 

SA: Where did the idea for this book come from?

MW: I have been studying and working with community, parent, and youth organizing groups as well as with education activists for twenty years. Until recently, most of these efforts had been focused in local areas but over the past five years, I witnessed a growing national movement. I thought it was time to write a book about this new, emerging movement and wanted to have organizers and activists have a chance to speak for themselves – share their own personal stories, powerful analysis, and successful strategies for creating educational justice in schools and communities.

SA: What gap in the literature does this book address?

MW: This book approaches the failures of our educational system as a profound racial justice issue, rooted in the lack of power that low-income communities of color have in our society. It argues that we need a social justice movement led by those most affected – parents and students of color – as well as educators and allies in other movements to create power for communities and systemic change in public education. It also identifies effective strategies for how to build this movement and create equity-oriented change in schools and communities.

SA: What types of projects and dialogues do you hope this book will inspire?

MW: I hope this book will provoke a discussion about the depth of systemic racism in our public education system and what it will take to address it. I hope it helps people appreciate the important work [of] people who are often ignored in our society – like parents and students of color – but are leading change efforts across the country.

SA: How have your affiliations with the McCormack Graduate School and UMass Boston assisted with the publication of this book?
MW: I believe it is important for our public universities to be at the forefront of working with communities to create equity and justice in education and beyond. UMass Boston and MGS support this mission and the research and engagement work I do for educational justice.

SA: What are some other projects you hope to pursue in the coming years?

MW: The people who came together to create this book became excited about creating an idea and strategy space for movement building that we are calling the People’s Think Tank. We are touring the country engaging communities and educators around the need to create a stronger and more intersectional social justice movement with racial and educational justice at its center. We will be launching the People’s Think Tank next year as the culmination of this engagement process and take the next step to build strategic understanding and actionable knowledge for the movement and its supporters.

SA: Anything else that you’d like to share with the MGS community about this book?

MW: This book is very personal to me. I grew up in a blue-collar family and community and public schools gave me a chance to go to college and access the world. Too many young people, especially poor children and children of color, are denied that access and are consigned to lives of continued poverty or incarceration. This book shines a light on the way forward for our country to reject our racial history and create a better future for all our young people.

 

 

April 26, 2017
by justinmaher
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New Werby Interns to Research Homelessness and Housing Stability

By the Center for Social Policy

Former Professor and Senior Fellow Elaine Werby

The late Elaine Werby, Professor and Center for Social Policy Senior Fellow

The Center for Social Policy is pleased to welcome Department of Public Policy and Public Affairs PhD Students Vishakha Agarwal and Jason Wright as our summer 2017 Werby Interns.

The interns will engage in a directed work assignment or conduct an independent research project closely related to a Center for Social Policy priority area. Vishakha and Jason will be conducting research for our On Solid Ground project, which aims to improve housing stability and economic mobility for low income families.

Named in honor of long-time Center for Social Policy senior research fellow and housing policy expert Elaine Werby, the internship offers a $2,500 award to two undergraduate or graduate students from any academic discipline at UMass Boston who wish to gain research and evaluation experience related to the eradication of poverty, especially in Massachusetts, New England, and the United States.

 

The Center for Social Policy (CSP) is based at UMass Boston’s McCormack Graduate School. CSP is a research and evaluation center for policy makers, funders, and business leaders that researches the root causes of economic hardship and examines the impact of public policies and employment practices in order to boost economic well-being.  The center’s team brings with them a wealth of community and workforce development experience.

February 28, 2017
by McCormack Speaks
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Do legislative staffers deserve a raise, too?

by Christa Kelleher, Research and Policy Director
Center for Women in Politics and Public Policy

MA State House domeNow that Massachusetts legislators have secured increased compensation for themselves, they should take a hard look at the pay levels of those who work for them. Fair and livable wages should be the norm for all workers whether they are employed by private, nonprofit, or public entities. Those who step up into a public service role as a legislative aide, budget analyst, chief of staff, or any of the other positions essential to our representational democracy deserve to be compensated fairly and adequately.

Yet it’s unclear whether this is the case here in Massachusetts. While earnings data are available through Massachusetts Open Checkbook, no titles are provided for employees listed and it’s not possible to systematically examine salaries by position, by legislative office, or by the race, ethnicity, or sex/gender identity of staff members.

There may never be an ideal moment to address the topic of pay for those who work in the Legislature.

Read the full story.

This blog is posted with permission from Mass-INC, publisher of Commonwealth Magazine.

Christa Kelleher, PhD      Research Director, Center for Women in Politics & Public Policy, McCormack Graduate SchoolChrista Kelleher oversees research on women’s public leadership and a range of public policy issues that affect women, with a particular focus on women’s reproductive and maternal health. She specializes in identifying, analyzing, and promoting public policies that improve the conditions of women’s lives; advancing women’s public leadership; state and local policy development

February 14, 2017
by McCormack Speaks
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A Cavalcade of Controversies: Trump’s Domestic and Foreign Policy Agendas

Policy roundtableA recent Boston Globe columnist, reporting on President Donald Trump’s first few weeks in the White House, described recent events as “a cavalcade of controversies.” What an astute (and alliterative) observation.

As part of encouraging broader discussions of this new policy landscape, the McCormack Graduate School recently partnered with the College of Liberal Arts at UMass Boston to host two policy roundtables to discuss President Trump’s domestic and foreign policy agendas.

We invite you to read about our analyses, watch the videos, and engage in the national chatter by sharing your comments on this blog.

The Trump Administration: Domestic Policy Roundtable

Read the news story

Watch the video

The Trump Administration: Foreign Policy Roundtable

Read the news story

Watch the video

February 1, 2017
by McCormack Speaks
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Equality is a Zero Sum Game

By Edward Henry
An International Relations student at the McCormack Graduate School

human rights

When I was asked to write a piece on my experiences attending the Women’s March, I wanted to write about the festive atmosphere that permeated the march. I wanted to write about arriving downtown early to feel the excitement of the marchers already streaming towards the Common. When I sat down to write, I intended to report the positivity in addition to addressing the critiques of the march. But, the videos and images from the Inauguration Day protests in DC, the police presence in the Boston companion march that night, and the police presence at the Boston Protest against the Muslim Ban led to a change in direction.

The Women’s March was successful in pulling millions worldwide into the streets to stand in support of women’s equality in addition to a host of equality issues. But reporting only that would be repeating the mistakes of previous equality movements. Continue Reading →

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