McCormack Speaks

July 24, 2018
by saadiaahmad001
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McCormack’s Master of Public Administration Program Earns NASPAA Accreditation

The McCormack Graduate School’s Master of Public Administration program (MPA) is among six new programs earning accreditation by the Network of Schools of Public Policy, Affairs, and Administration (NASPAA). NASPAA accreditation is considered the global standard of excellence for graduate programs in public service disciplines. The MPA program at UMass Boston will appear on the NASPAA Annual Roster of Accredited Programs in conformity with standards established for professional masters degrees in public affairs and administration and maintain accreditation status for seven years, beginning September 1, 2018.

“Our MPA program has been training the government and nonprofit sector workforce in the region for more than three decades.  NASPAA accreditation is a milestone in the history of our program signaling our commitment to advancing knowledge, research, and practice in public service,” said Amy Smith, associate professor and director of the MPA program.  “We are proud to join the roster of more than 200 NASPAA accredited programs from around the globe.”

In addition to earning accreditation, UMass Boston’s MPA program is ranked in the top 100 graduate programs in public affairs by the 2018 U.S. News and World Report Rankings and fourth in Massachusetts.  Known for its cohort model, the MPA program offers evening, weekend, and on-line courses to meet the needs of working professionals.

The UMass Boston MPA program prepares students to contribute to society as leaders, public administrators, policy analysts, and program evaluators in the governmental and nonprofit sectors to advance an efficient and effective public sector; and serve the public good and promote the public value, social justice, and equality in the Greater Boston area, Massachusetts, the United States, and in the global community.

November 2, 2017
by McCormack Speaks
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Detecting Media Bias

by Matt Braman, McCormack Graduate School student

a stack of newspapersWith “fake news” attracting so much attention in the past year, I’ve found myself questioning my own news sources much more often. While I consider this to be a normal response in an unpredictable political climate, it has also led me to consider some of the other, more subtle, ways in which news presentation might misinform us. For example, how biased is our news media currently? And if our media are biased, how does that affect our understanding of current events?

Much of the research in this area finds that while people do frequently detect bias in news reporting, often their conclusions are unsubstantiated (Baum and Groeling, 2008; Lin, Haridakis, & Hanson, 2016). In what has been coined the “hostile media” phenomenon, individuals from completely opposite ends of the political spectrum often perceive bias from the same source, even when it is objectively considered to be “relatively balanced and non-partisan” (Vallone et al., 1985 as cited in Groeling, 2013).  Unsurprisingly, this not only makes detecting bias in the media difficult, but also makes attributing such bias to journalistic intent even more challenging (Baum and Groeling, 2008).  Continue Reading →

May 17, 2017
by justinmaher
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From Microsoft to McCormack

In this profile from the Microsoft Alumni Network, Center for Social Policy Director Susan Crandall reflects on her early days at Microsoft and how it fostered her passion for creating access and opportunity through workforce development.

Susan Crandall

Susan Crandall

“Susan moved across the country to start in a PhD program at the University of Washington in Organizational Behavior. And then it hit her: To become an authority on how organizations work, she first needed to gain her own experience working at a corporation. Susan took leave of her PhD program and went looking for a job. What she found was a position at Microsoft in the newly formed HR Executive and Management Development Group.”

Read more.

May 11, 2017
by justinmaher
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The Data Behind Romney’s Binders

Mitt Romney

Former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney

 

In Lucia Graves’s recent New Republic piece, Carol Hardy-Fanta, senior fellow at the McCormack Graduate School, sheds light on gender equity in former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney’s administration and those infamous “binders of women.”

Read “Trump is Giving Us a Case of Romnesia” here.

 

 

Carol Hardy-Fanta, McCormack Graduate School

Carol Hardy-Fanta

Carol Hardy-Fanta (PhD, Brandeis University), a senior fellow at UMass Boston’s John W. McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies and former director of the Center for Women in Politics and Public Policy, is the lead author on  the new book, Contested Transformation: Race, Gender, and Political Leadership in 21st Century America, issued recently by Cambridge University Press and coauthored with Pei-te Lien, Dianne Pinderhughes, and Christine Sierra.

February 28, 2017
by McCormack Speaks
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Do legislative staffers deserve a raise, too?

by Christa Kelleher, Research and Policy Director
Center for Women in Politics and Public Policy

MA State House domeNow that Massachusetts legislators have secured increased compensation for themselves, they should take a hard look at the pay levels of those who work for them. Fair and livable wages should be the norm for all workers whether they are employed by private, nonprofit, or public entities. Those who step up into a public service role as a legislative aide, budget analyst, chief of staff, or any of the other positions essential to our representational democracy deserve to be compensated fairly and adequately.

Yet it’s unclear whether this is the case here in Massachusetts. While earnings data are available through Massachusetts Open Checkbook, no titles are provided for employees listed and it’s not possible to systematically examine salaries by position, by legislative office, or by the race, ethnicity, or sex/gender identity of staff members.

There may never be an ideal moment to address the topic of pay for those who work in the Legislature.

Read the full story.

This blog is posted with permission from Mass-INC, publisher of Commonwealth Magazine.

Christa Kelleher, PhD      Research Director, Center for Women in Politics & Public Policy, McCormack Graduate SchoolChrista Kelleher oversees research on women’s public leadership and a range of public policy issues that affect women, with a particular focus on women’s reproductive and maternal health. She specializes in identifying, analyzing, and promoting public policies that improve the conditions of women’s lives; advancing women’s public leadership; state and local policy development

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