How COVID-19 Has Changed Everyday Life for Older Adults, Long After Pandemic’s Onset

By Taryn Hojlo

How do older adults think about the COVID-19 threat and go about their lives now, many months after the virus first changed their approach to activities of every kind?

Of course there is no single answer to that question, and the way older adults look to the future with the pandemic remaining a real threat varies as well. The Gerontology Institute Blog contacted several members of the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UMass Boston to ask them about how they approached the problem and how it affects their routines. They offer a small sample of everyday lives among older adults in the age of COVID-19.

Mona, 69, and Phil Rosen, 72 in Easton, Mass.

 When news of the coronavirus first appeared, Mona and Phil were both reasonably concerned about contracting the virus. They isolated themselves from friends and family, only leaving the house for essential activities. However, they’ve begun to venture out a bit more in recent weeks – while still being careful to adhere to health authority guidelines. Continue reading

UMB Gerontologists Tell Legislators Research, Preparation Keys to Helping Older Adults Deal with Impact of COVID-19

Len Fishman, Elizabeth Dugan and Jan Murtchler

Left to right, Gerontology Institute Director Len Fishman, associate professor Elizabeth Dugan and professor Jan Mutchler. Fishman, Dugan and Mutchler appear in photos below.

UMass Boston gerontologists offered legislators two suggestions for state government in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic: Help researchers better understand what has happened to older adults and get elder Massachusetts residents prepared for a more challenging future.

Gerontology Institute Director Len Fishman, associate professor Elizabeth Dugan and professor Jan Mutchler all appeared individually at a May 15 virtual listening session hosted by the legislature’s Joint Committee on Elder Affairs. They joined a wide range of advocates, policymakers and other members of the public to describe the impact the pandemic has had on older adults and what state government should do to help. Continue reading

Beth Dugan on COVID-19 in Aging Populations: “Older People are Part of the Solution”

This conversation with Gerontology associate professor Elizabeth Dugan was conducted by the McCormack Graduate School and  first appeared on the UMass Boston News web page.

Q: Can we start by talking a bit about the aging population in Massachusetts and how it’s similar or different from other places facing the COVID-19 crisis?

Beth Dugan:  I would say overall, we have more positives to work with. Here in Massachusetts, we have more than a million people who are 65 and older, so we have more older people than other states. And one thing that’s interesting to think about is that longevity is a new experience in terms of human development. We’re about the first or second generation where most people could expect to live to old age. Continue reading

The Virtual Semester: How UMass Gerontology Students are Adapting to Remote Learning While Campus Remains Closed

Claire Wickersham home office

STEP INTO MY OFFICE: Author Claire Wickersham turned her bedroom closet into a phone booth-sized office with a standing work station.

By Claire Wickersham

Students are making a lot of adjustments in the spring semester driven online by the COVID-19 pandemic. New technology and different work environments bring a whole new meaning to work and home life balance.

The good news: Many are adapting well to new ways of learning and working, often adding an element of creativity to the process.

For UMass Boston gerontology students, some classes are held in real-time via apps like Zoom, while others are recorded. Some use PowerPoint with voiceovers for slides. Assistantship work is being done off campus and meetings held virtually.

Some students have even gone home for the remainder of the semester. Continue reading

How Healthy Aging Data Report Can Contribute to Fight Against COVID-19 in Massachusetts

Beth Dugan, Nina Silverstein, Chae Man Lee

Left to right, associate professor Elizabeth Dugan, professor Nina Silverstein and post-doctoral assistant Chae Man Lee.

A research team at the McCormack Graduate School’s Gerontology Institute published its most recent edition of the Massachusetts Healthy Aging Data Report late in 2018. The report provided detailed information on the health status of older adults across the state. The team, led by associate professor Elizabeth Dugan, also collected a massive amount of local data contained in the report’s 379 separate community profiles.

The Gerontology Institute Blog recently spoke with Dugan and two other team members — professor Nina Silverstein and post-doctoral assistant Chae Man (Jay) Lee — about the report and how it could contribute to the state’s response to the coronavirus pandemic. Here’s what they had to say: Continue reading

Institute Talk: A Conversation with Hospice Physician Joanne Lynn About Nursing Homes Dealing with COVID-19


Joanne Lynn is a nationally recognized expert on issues related to palliative and end-of-life care. A geriatrician and hospice physician, she is the author of hundreds of journal articles and many books on issues concerning long-term services and supports. Very recently, she has written articles offering detailed advice for nursing homes dealing with the coronavirus pandemic and an overview of policy priorities for upcoming COVID-19 related deaths out of hospitals.

Gerontology Institute Director Len Fishman spoke with Lynn on April 3 about the daunting health challenges facing nursing homes and the best ways facilities can respond to them. The following transcript has been edited for length and clarity.

Len Fishman: Let’s start by explaining the particular risk COVID-19 poses to residents of nursing homes and other facilities like assisted living?

 

 

Joanne Lynn: The people who live in nursing homes and other residential facilities tend to be not only in the age group that has high risk but also to have multiple complicating conditions that make it very difficult to survive a serious bout of COVID-19. Still, many people get a mild case and sail through or have very mild flu symptoms and feel sick for a few days but do okay. But a substantial proportion will have a serious illness. And it looks like something on the order of around 20 percent will die from COVID-19 in these conditions. Continue reading

Institute Talk: A Conversation with Home Care Executive Kevin Smith on Service in the Age of COVID-19

Home care agencies and their employees are performing critical services that help clients continue to live independently, work that has become even more challenging and dangerous in the coronavirus pandemic.

Kevin Smith is the chief executive of Best of Care, an agency headquartered in Quincy, Mass., that serves clients in greater Boston and many other areas of Massachusetts. Smith is also president of the Home Care Aide Council, Inc., a trade association of 70 agencies providing home care services in Massachusetts.

Gerontology Institute Director Len Fishman spoke with Smith on March 23 about home health agencies and their workers during the COVID-19 crisis. The following transcript was edited for length and clarity.

Len Fishman: Tell us briefly who your agency serves.

 

 

Kevin Smith: We are serving about 1,500 people. They are typically over age 60 and actually skew toward their 80s. It’s fair to say many depend on the care of our aides to remain independent and out of facility-based care. Continue reading