The Fiske Center Blog

Weblog for the Fiske Center for Archaeological Research at the University of Massachusetts Boston.

July 2, 2014
by John Steinberg
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BURIAL HILL DIG: Can archaeologists solve a 300-year-old mystery by 2020?

BURIAL HILL DIG The Old Colony Memorial (plymouth.wickedlocal.com) had an interesting story about the the work at Plymouth.  If the link goes down, you can see a printed version here.  It is perhaps one of the most detailed stories on the work.   The Author, Frank Mand, is an interesting guy.  He has been taking a photo around Plymouth at sunrise for the last year.

June 21, 2014
by John Steinberg
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Front Page Boston Globe Story on Archaeological Excavations in Plymouth: The mystery of where Plymouth got its start

Boston Globe article about work in Plymouth

Boston Globe article about work in Plymouth

There is a wonderful page 1 story in the Boston Globe today about the work in Plymouth.  Dave Landon does a great job in the attached video explaining the work.  There are also a series of very nice photos that go with the story.  If you have trouble with the Globe site, you can see a printed version here.  The Author, David Filipov, has done a number of great stories.

June 20, 2014
by John Steinberg
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EU7 3D views of the bricks

EU7We were out taking pictures of the bricks in Excavation Unit 7 on Burial Hill in Plymouth yesterday and Doug Bolender put together another 3D view.  This one is can be viewed on the web, and does not require downloading like the last one.   EU7 is where, according to the 1874 Beers map stood a school, probably the one that gave the street its name.  You can see the whole map at the Boston Public Library (Leventhal Map Center).

June 19, 2014
by John Steinberg
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Ground Penetrating Radar and Excavation Unit 3

Excavation Unit 3 superimposed over GPR

Excavation Unit 3 superimposed over GPR

In this GPR Slice image, made by Brian Damiata, hard reflectors from the Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) survey are shown in yellow and red.  In this GPR- slice, blue areas did not return any energy.   This slice is from about 90 cm below the ground surface.  The location of the hard reflectors (red and yellow) suggest that the stone wall excavated in EU3  probably continues to the southeast.   EU3 is the excavation with the overhead image superimposed.  If you look closely, you can see a row of stones in the east.  You can see more of EU3 in a previous blog post.  The red lines in the jpg are our best estimate as to the location of structures in the 1874 map, also described in a previous blog post.

June 19, 2014
by John Steinberg
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Plymouth Burial Hill 3D view of Excavation Unit 3

The wall at the bottom of this unit is probably associated with one of the stable structures seen in the old map of burial hill and described in a previous post on this blogBurial_Hill_EU3Doug Bolender has created a 3D PDF that you can download and move around.  The file will not work in the web browser (it will just be a blank page).  You have to download it to your machine, and open it in a new version of Acrobat and allow it to run.    Once up and running you can look down into the buckets, as well as the excavation.

January 14, 2014
by John Steinberg
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Kate Johnson’s JAS paper is picked up by the Huffington Post

Article about Kate's work

Article about Kate’s work

Kate Johnson (who got her MA in historical Archaeology from UMass Boston)  recently published paper in the Journal of Archaeological Science called  Rediscovering the lost archaeological landscape of southern New England using airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR).  This paper was picked up first by National Geographic, then by Science, then by the Huffington Post, and then most recently by CT NPR.  Kate gave us a preview of this paper a few months ago.

October 29, 2013
by John Steinberg
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Brown Bag Lecture by Kate Johnson

Department of Anthropology and the Fiske Center for Archaeological Research
Brown Bag Lecture Series

Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) as a methodological tool for historical archaeology in New England

by

Kate Johnson (University of Connecticut)

Wednesday, October 30, 2013 at 12:00 McCormack, first floor, room 503