The Fiske Center Blog

Weblog for the Fiske Center for Archaeological Research at the University of Massachusetts Boston.

September 30, 2014
by John Steinberg
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Audrey Horning to speak on “The Ever Present Past”

Special Archaeology Fall Lecture at UMass Boston

Professor Audrey Horning of the School of Geography, Archaeology and Palaeoecology at  Queen’s University in Belfast, Ireland will speak:
Wednesday, October 1
3:00-4:00 pm McCormack Building, First Floor, Room 503

The title of her talk is:

“The ever present past: Colonial legacies and the archaeology of the Atlantic world”

All are invited….

July 8, 2014
by Fiske Center
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Excavations end raising brand new questions

At the close of excavations last week the Search for Deb Newman offered some exciting possibilities for future fieldwork while raising some tantalizing questions.
The minimal amount of artifacts recovered from the most likely area for the home forced us to reconsider what short-term occupations like Deb Newman’s would have looked like. In order to better understand the area as a whole we embarked on an intensive STP survey, which ultimately lead to the opening of 2M X 2M excavation units in three different locations: Deb Newman, Lewis Ellis, and the “enclosure”.
Carolyn and Janice focused on the Lewis Ellis site, putting in a unit near the foundation after STPs in the area turned up large pieces of 19th century ceramics. They uncovered a potential builder’s trench (pictured below) and piece of boot leather in addition to other 19th century artifacts consistent with the STPs. Though Lewis Ellis was a bootmaker, neither of these pieces of evidence are enough to make a case for the site definitely being either his workshop or home. They are, however, enough to bring us back to the site in the Fall to investigate further.

Potential builder’s trench uncovered by Carolyn and Janice that may be a part of Lewis Ellis’s shop

Potential builder’s trench uncovered by Carolyn and Janice that may be a part of Lewis Ellis’s shop


Down the hill Kristina and I worked in a unit adjacent to the enclosure, next to an STP that yielded an usual amount of creamware, mochaware, and hand-painted polychrome creamware in the “duff”, or topsoil above the cultural strata.
Kristina and Jessica clean their unit for a photo.  The red tint is from stains in the B horizon along the bedrock, which Dr. Trigg suggested came from decayed root

Kristina and Jessica clean their unit for a photo. The red tint is from stains in the B horizon along the bedrock, which Dr. Trigg suggested came from decayed root


The unit was part of our strategy to understand the function of the enclosure, which could have contained a school or meeting house. The school, however, was never built according to historic maps of Grafton (see map pictured below). Dennis Piechota has suggested that the unusual amount of sediments (as opposed to soils) in the unit were colluvial sediments being washed downstream from an area close by, potentially explaining the wealth of ceramics in the “duff”. This initially seemed to provide evidence in favor of a meeting house, however, Steph and Sam’s unit inside the enclosure ended unexpectedly in bedrock, making the results of Dr. Trigg’s phosphate analysis and Dennis’s thin sections all the more important for our understanding of this area.
1795 map of the town of Grafton showing the location of a meeting house

1795 map of the town of Grafton showing the location of a meeting house


Back at the Deb Newman site Danny, Shala, and Dallana opened a unit in a second area where high concentrations of artifacts were recovered from the 2010 STPs. In true archaeological fashion, they began turning up brick, ceramics, and even a burned tobacco pipe in the last week.
While we are starting to form a clearer picture of the historic landscape, this season’s excavations ultimately left us with questions that can only be answered by future excavations, proving that archaeology means never having to say you’re finished.
The 2014 Hassanamesit Woods team

The 2014 Hassanamesit Woods team

July 8, 2014
by Fiske Center
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Intriguing answers to some old questions lead to new possibilities

Since Day 1 we’ve run into puzzling or just plain odd stratigraphy that’s raised more questions than answers as we’ve continued to unravel the mystery of Deb Newman. Fortunately Fiske Center conservator Dennis Piechota came out to the site yesterday to collect soil samples for thin section analysis and took some time in the afternoon to explain some of what we’ve come across. He also offered insight into what it all might mean for our interpretation of our three sites (Deb Newman, the enclosure, Lewis Ellis), and was gracious enough to let me record his talk, excerpts of which you can listen to below.

Excerpt 1: Dennis explains some of the stratigraphy at the site, including the deeper A horizon soils that influenced our STP survey and what kinds of human impacts these might indicate (for a brief review of the survey click here).

Excerpt 2: Dennis explains the stratigraphy at the Lewis Ellis site, where Carolyn and Janice uncovered a buried A horizon

July 2, 2014
by John Steinberg
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BURIAL HILL DIG: Can archaeologists solve a 300-year-old mystery by 2020?

BURIAL HILL DIG The Old Colony Memorial (plymouth.wickedlocal.com) had an interesting story about the the work at Plymouth.  If the link goes down, you can see a printed version here.  It is perhaps one of the most detailed stories on the work.   The Author, Frank Mand, is an interesting guy.  He has been taking a photo around Plymouth at sunrise for the last year.