Video: Marc Cohen Joins Bipartisan Policy Center Panel on Future of LTSS Finance

Marc Cohen

How should America finance long term services and supports in the future?

Marc Cohen, co-director of the LeadingAge LTSS Center @UMass Boston, participated in a panel discussion on the future of LTSS financing, hosted by the Bipartisan

Policy Center in Washington on Jan. 31. Cohen, also a gerontology professor at the McCormack Graduate School, discussed an LTSS finance plan he developed recently with colleagues from Georgetown University and the Urban Institute.

A video of the entire panel presentation covers comments and ideas from six participants. Cohen first appears in the video at about the 47:00 mark.

UMass Professor Marc Cohen Presents New “Policy Roadmap” for Future of LTSS Finance

What would a better way to finance long-term services and supports for older Americans really look like? Even more importantly: How would it perform?

Marc Cohen, co-director of the LeadingAge LTSS Center @UMass Boston, and two colleagues took up that challenge and developed a new “policy roadmap” combining public catastrophic insurance with gap-filling private LTSS insurance focused on middle-income people.

“The fundamental LTSS financing problem is the absence of an effective insurance mechanism to protect people against the cost of extensive LTSS they may require over the course of their lives,” said Cohen, also a professor at UMass Boston’s McCormack Graduate School. Continue reading

Questions and Answers About the New LeadingAge LTSS Center @ UMass Boston

The Gerontology Institute at the University of Massachusetts Boston and LeadingAge have joined forces to create a new research center called the LeadingAge LTSS Center @UMass Boston. Katie Sloan, LeadingAge president and CEO; Len Fishman, director of the Gerontology Institute at the University of Massachusetts Boston; and LTSS Center Co-directors Robyn Stone and Marc Cohen recently answered questions about the new center.

WHY DID LEADINGAGE AND UMASS BOSTON DECIDE TO CREATE THE LEADINGAGE LTSS CENTER @UMASS BOSTON?

Katie Sloan: LeadingAge and the Gerontology Institute at UMass Boston share a strong commitment to improving the quality, affordability and accessibility of long-term services and supports (LTSS) through data and evidence of what really works. So, it made perfect sense for us to bring together our respective expertise and resources in a joint center focused on applied research in the LTSS field. Continue reading

UMass Boston and LeadingAge Establish New LTSS Research Center

LeadingAge is joining with the Gerontology Institute at the University of Massachusetts Boston to create a new research center called the LeadingAge LTSS Center @UMass Boston.

The new center is the first in the country to combine the expertise of applied and academic researchers with the unique perspectives of providers and consumers of long-term services and supports (LTSS). The center will conduct research aimed at transforming the way LTSS are financed, delivered, and experienced by older adults and their families.

“We are delighted to announce this unique partnership between two leading organizations with deep experience in aging policy and research,” said Katie Smith Sloan, president and CEO of LeadingAge. “Together, we have committed ourselves to improving the quality, affordability and accessibility of long-term services and supports through data and evidence of what really works.”

The LeadingAge LTSS Center will be co-directed by Dr. Robyn Stone, senior vice president of research at LeadingAge, and Professor Marc Cohen, leader of LTSS research at the Gerontology Institute, part of the McCormack Graduate School at UMass Boston (both pictured above). Continue reading

How Medicaid Per Capita Caps Will Affect those Needing Long-Term Services and Supports

By Marc A. Cohen, Ph.D., Michael Miller, MA, Leena Sharma, MPP

Earlier this week, the Republicans in the House of Representatives put forward their plan – the American Health Care Act (AHCA) — for the repeal and replacement of sections of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).  In addition to repealing the health-related tax and subsidy provisions in the ACA, replacing them with refundable tax credits, the plan also changes the Medicaid program from a federal-state partnership to a per capita cap program.  More specifically, Section 121 of the Act would use each State’s spending in FY2016 as a base year to set targeted spending for each enrollee category in FY2019 (and subsequent years) for that state.  Each state’s targeted spending amount would increase by the percentage increase in the medical care component of the consumer price index for all urban consumers from September 2019 to September of the next fiscal year.  The enrollee categories for which separate caps would be established include the: (1) elderly, (2) blind and disabled, (3) children, (3) non-expansion adults, and (4) expansion adults. Continue reading