Gerontology Faculty Members Jeffrey Stokes and Qian Song Win NIA Research Grants

Jeffrey Stokes

Jeffrey Stokes

Qian Song

Qian Song

What’s better than a grant funding new faculty research? Two grants.

Two assistant professors from the McCormack Graduate School’s Gerontology Department recently won two-year grants of $152,500 each from the National Institute on Aging. Work on both projects began recently.

Jeffrey Stokes received a grant to study the impact of loneliness of a spouse on the health and well-being of both older adult partners in a marriage. Qian Song is the principle investigator on a project that won a grant to examine the long-term effects of job loss on health in a setting that mimics a natural experiment – the massive layoffs of State-Owned Enterprise (SOE) workers in urban China. Continue reading

Video: Gerontology Institute Director Len Fishman on Opportunities for Healthy Aging Technology

 

As the population ages in the United States and around the world, technology will surely play a role assisting in the care of millions of older adults and help them lead productive lives. But how will that actually work?

Gerontology Institute Director Len Fishman joined a panel of medical and business leaders at Harvard Catalyst to discuss the role of technology in serving a rapidly growing population of older adults. A brief video highlights interviews with Fishman and other speakers at the event.

Fishman noted that people currently in their 60s are among the first in history to reach that age with an expectation of living into their 80s or well beyond, and they are planning accordingly. As a result, he said, “there’s an opportunity to have a conversation with people about how technology can help. The technology – some of it is disease-specific, some of it is more to help people stay well. You’re talking about almost 50 million people, that’s a huge market.”

The Harvard Catalyst event was held in June at the Countway Library of Medicine in Boston.

Institute Talk: A Conversation with Daughterhood Founder Anne Tumlinson on Challenges of Caring for Aging Parents

Anne Tumlinson is the nationally recognized eldercare expert who founded Daughterhood, an online community providing support and advice to adult children caring for their aging parents. She is also the founder of Anne Tumlinson Innovations, a research and advisory firm focused on transforming the way care is delivered and financed.

With more than 25 years of research and consulting experience, Tumlinson has often testified in Washington and written on innovation in aging services. Previously, she led Medicaid program oversight at the federal Office of Management and Budget.

Recently she talked with Gerontology Institute Director Len Fishman about the evolution of Daughterhood, practical problems facing caregivers and policy issues that affect innovation in the field. The following is an edited version of their conversation. Continue reading

Building Better Networks for Adults Aging with Autism

This post originally appeared in Autism Spectrum News.

By Caitlin Coyle and Danielle Waldron

Although traditionally understood as a childhood condition, autism is a lifelong disorder that presents in both children and adults. Many of the children with this disorder who were born during the last century and who are now reaching mid- and later-life did not receive formal diagnoses of autism. Further, increases in human longevity and the aging of the largest birth cohort (born between 1946-1964) in our nation’s history suggest that although prevalence rates of autism remain around 1% of the population, the sheer numbers of these adults stands to increase dramatically in coming years.

Caitlin Coyle, left and Danielle Waldron

Caitlin Coyle, left, and Danielle Waldron.

These adults on the spectrum who live much or all of their lives without diagnoses, often struggle to develop their personal identities. Due to their difficulties with communication and relationship development, they work tirelessly to manage their disorder in order to assemble lives that include stable employment, intimate social relationships and families. As one adult aging with autism describes (his or her) life without an autism diagnosis, “…something basic was missing: Not knowing how to think about and appreciate ourselves.” Continue reading

Institute Talk: A Conversation with Carl V. Hill on the NIA and Health Disparity Research

Carl V. Hill is director of the Office of Special Populations at the National Institute on Aging, which leads the federal government in conducting and supporting research on aging and the health and well-being of older people. Hill recently visited the UMass Boston campus, where he was the featured speaker at the first annual Gerontology Institute Fellows Dinner. Earlier that day, Hill talked with Institute Director Len Fishman about his career, how he promotes funding for health disparity research and current priorities for the institute’s $3.1 billion research budget. The following is an edited version of their conversation.

Len Fishman: How did you first become interested in a career in public health and health disparity research in particular?

Carl V. Hill: I was in the first class of the Masters of Public Health program at the Morehouse School of Medicine. The founder of that program was Dr. Bill Jenkins, who passed away this year. He was one of the first whistle-blowers on the Tuskegee Syphilis Study. He was also a mentor to many African-Americans in public health and he started this program that allowed many of us to have a start. Later, I had a chance to study for my PhD at the University of Michigan. I worked with people like Woody Neighbors and James S. Jackson, who both worked on the Survey of American Life. They also worked on the Survey on Black Americans, the first data collection on the lives and health of African-Americans in this country. Continue reading

Institute Research Team Gets Funding for Healthy Aging Reports Covering Rhode Island, Connecticut

Healthy Aging NH

UMass Boston gerontology PhD student Haowei Wang shared New Hampshire Healthy Aging data with N.H. state Rep. James MacKay at a legislative breakfast in April.

A UMass Boston research team that recently published comprehensive reports on the health of older adults living in Massachusetts and New Hampshire has received new funding to produce similar studies covering two additional New England states.

The team at the McCormack Graduate School’s Gerontology Institute received grants of $448,000 from the Tufts Health Plan Foundation to support healthy aging data reports for Rhode Island and Connecticut. Tufts had funded the earlier healthy aging state reports as well.

Research for the new reports began this month and is expected to be complete by April 2021. The team will be updating a previous Rhode Island report it published in 2016. The Connecticut research will become the basis of that state’s first healthy aging data report. Continue reading

Gerontology Institute Research Team Completes Report on Healthy Aging in New Hampshire

Mass. Heatlhy Aging Team

The Healthy Aging team, left to right: Wendy Wang PhD, Bon Kim, Nina Silverstein PhD, Jay Lee PhD, Sae Hwang Han, Shiva Prisad, Frank Porell PhD, Haowei Wang, Beth Dugan PhD. Team members not in photo: Natalie Pitheckoff and Evan Chunga.

A research team from the University of Massachusetts Boston has delivered a comprehensive new report on the health of older people in New Hampshire, along with detailed profiles of 244 communities in their state.

The first-ever New Hampshire Healthy Aging Data Report was prepared by researchers at the McCormack Graduate School’s Gerontology Institute, led by associate professor Beth Dugan. The report, funded by the Tufts Health Plan Foundation, was released April 2 at a legislative breakfast at the New Hampshire statehouse.

“We are all aging,” said Dugan. “Identifying and understanding the gaps in healthy aging will allow communities to continue to adapt, improving quality of life for all New Hampshire residents.” Continue reading