Institute Talk: A Conversation with Lisa Gurgone on Supporting Area Agencies That Provide Elder Services

Lisa Gurgone is the executive director of Mass Home Care, the trade association representing the Commonwealth’s network of 28 Aging Services Access Points (ASAPs) and Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs). This single, statewide network of coordinated care delivers home and community based services to over 60,000 individuals per month, providing over $600 million per year in services.

Gerontology Institute Director Len Fishman spoke with Gurgone recently about home care services and how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected both consumers and workers providing care. The following transcript has been edited for length and clarity.

Len FishmanLen Fishman: What would a composite profile of a consumer you serve look like?

 

 

 

Lisa GurgoneLisa Gurgone: The typical age is 82 and about one in five are 90 or older. About 55 percent live alone. We have a lot of women with basic homecare needs, someone to help with shopping and food prep. They may need some bathing assistance or have trouble getting dressed in the morning. People sometimes stay in our system for a very long time and may need additional services as they age. We might sub-contract with a visiting nurses association to provide more skilled care. It runs the gamut but the goal is to help these people stay in the community as long as they want. Continue reading

COAs and COVID-19: Managing New Issues on Communications, Food Security and Volunteerism

Bread in Bridgwater

Among many volunteers, a retired Bridgwater State University professor baked bread for distribution through his local COA.

The Gerontology Institute’s Center for Social and Demographic Research on Aging is publishing a series of blog posts to follow the ongoing impact of the coronavirus pandemic on Councils on Aging across Massachusetts.  We encourage COA readers to tell us about their experiences or responses to blog posts by using the reply box at the bottom of each post.

It’s a good thing Zoom and lots of other communications technology exists these days. But the old-fashioned telephone is also playing important role in the plans councils on aging are following to keep in touch with their elder residents.

In Bridgewater, the Fire Department is assisting to help identify phone numbers from census data for over 5,000 residents who are age 60 or older. Those numbers are being used to make wellness calls, but also develop a huge database for town’s emergency response protocol.

In Billerica, volunteers are making about 150 calls each week to check in with elder residents and evaluate their needs.

“During calls to check on patrons, they are so grateful to be remembered,” said Billerica COA Director Jean Bushnell. “It was remarkable to discover that care and concerned flowed both ways, they were actually worried about our staff.” Continue reading

COAs and COVID-19: How Councils Are Adapting to Serve Their Communities

The Gerontology Institute’s Center for Social and Demographic Research on Aging is launching a series of blog posts to follow the ongoing impact of the coronavirus pandemic on Councils on Aging across Massachusetts. Posts reporting on conversations with COA directors about how they manage the evolving COVID-19 challenge will appear on the Gerontology Institute Blog. We encourage COA readers to tell us about their experiences or responses to blog posts by using the reply box at the bottom of each post. 

 How do you deal with a problem as overwhelming as the coronavirus pandemic? David Stevens prefers to think about that answer in phases.

Stevens, the executive director of the Massachusetts Councils on Aging (MCOA), has been leading an effort to provide support, coordinate resources and lead communication with his 350 member-COAs since the COVID-19 crisis gripped the state. Continue reading