McCormack Speaks

May 20, 2021
by jackli001
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Employment/Job Opportunities For MGS Students

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Posted: April 21, 2021
Company:
 The Arlington Housing Authority
Title: Property Manager

Description: The Arlington Housing Authority is currently seeking a qualified, self-starter to fill the position of Property Manager. The property manager; administers all conventional program waiting lists for selection of qualified applicants; performs screening and income verification of applicants, prepares leases and orientates new residents; conducts unit inspections, schedules maintenance work necessary for timely turnover of vacant units; conducts rent re-certifications for all conventional housing programs; schedules conferences for households with “for cause” lease violations and coordinates with the Authority’s legal counsel for pre-trial procedures for tenant evictions; provides social service referrals for households in crisis; prepares vacancy and turnover reports as required; performs other duties as assigned.

Salary Range: Full time position. Salary is commensurate with experience. The Authority also offers a benefit package including vacation and sick days, medical, dental, life, and optional long-term disability insurance.

Start Date: Immediately

Qualifications: The candidate must possess a strong working knowledge of Microsoft Office and be able to learn other computer software programs as needed. They must have strong written and verbal communication skills, excellent customer service skills, and an attention to detail and organization. A Bachelor’s Degree in business administration, public administration or a related field, and a minimum of three years of property management experience, preferably in affordable housing, are required. An equivalent combination of education and experience may be considered. Must have the ability to work with people of various socioeconomic backgrounds. Bilingual language skills a plus.

Application: Resumes will be accepted at the Authority office until the position is filled. Resumes should be sent to: Jack Nagle, Operations Manager, Arlington Housing Authority 4 Winslow Street, Arlington, MA 02474 or by emailing Jack Nagle at: jnagle@arlingtonhousing.org
The Arlington Housing Authority is an equal opportunity employer.

Posted: April 16, 2021
Company: Union Institute & University
Title: Full-time faculty member in Ethical & Creative Leadership

Start Date: July 2021

Additional Info: The program is based in Cincinnati, OH but faculty may live anywhere within the United States.

Application/Contact Info: Jennifer Raymond, Ph.D, Dean, Ph.D. Program in Interdisciplinary Studies (Jennifer.Raymond@myunion.edu)
Union Institute & University, 440 East McMillan Street, Cincinnati, OH 45206, 617-697-2017

March 29, 2019
by saadiaahmad001
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New Leadership Lends New Opportunities for Massachusetts Children

by Michelle Haimowitz, MPA student

While some public policy investments may eventually pay for themselves in savings, few public investments provide as much of a return on investment as early childhood education. For every dollar invested in high-quality early childhood education, local economies receive at least $7 in return.[1] Returns are not only found in educational achievements such as high school graduation rates, but in higher lifetime earnings, reduced teen pregnancy rates, and reduced incarceration rates among graduates of high-quality early learning programs.

Unfortunately, early childhood education does not receive as much public investment as the research shows it should. High-quality early education is dependent on the workforce and teachers in the classroom. However, lack of public investment leads to extreme rates of educator turnover – roughly 30% each year – which impedes children’s ability to learn in a consistent environment.[2] Early childhood educators are paid just a fraction of what their peers in public elementary classrooms make, despite often having the same degrees and credentials. In fact, 59 percent of all Head Start teachers in Massachusetts hold bachelor’s degrees.[3] Yet the average child care worker in Massachusetts makes less than $30,000 per year, less than half of what the average kindergarten teacher makes.[4] This doesn’t just put our children at a disadvantage, but costs the state enormously – nearly 40% of the early childhood workforce in Massachusetts receives some form of public assistance, at a cost of $35.6 million to the state and federal governments.[5]

This crisis is not impossible to solve; the answer is increased state investment in the early childhood education workforce. This year, Massachusetts is in a unique position with new State House leaders at the head of their respective chamber’s Committee on Ways and Means, the key budget writing committee. Representative Aaron Michlewitz and Senator Michael Rodrigues are both in the position to write their first budget, setting priorities for their tenures in these positions and guiding the legislature in determining state investments. Both Senator Rodrigues and Representative Michlewitz now have the opportunity to write a budget that invests in the field and the workforce that we know shows long-term returns to our state – early childhood education. These State House leaders can choose to spend state resources on early educators now rather than spending later in public assistance for those working with our youngest learners. If significant investments are made in early education quality and access – including investments to the Early Educator Rate Reserve, the Head Start State Supplemental Grant, and the Commonwealth Preschool Partnership Initiative – Massachusetts’ children, educators, and economy will be strengthened.

[1] First Five Years Fund. (n.d.). Quality Early Childhood Education: Why It Matters. Retrieved from https://www.ffyf.org/why-it-matters/

[2] Douglass, A. (2017, July 18). Massachusetts early education programs are in peril. The Boston Globe. Retrieved from https://www.bostonglobe.com/opinion/2017/07/18/massachusetts-early-education-programs-are-peril/rlyXHYwkYEKJz66kOtOi5J/story.html?event=event12

[3] Massachusetts Head Start Association. (2018). 2018 Annual Report. Retrieved from https://wwwmassheadstart.files.wordpress.com/2019/01/mhsa-anual-report-2018-online-version.pdf

[4] United States Department of Education. (2016, June 14). Fact Sheet: Troubling Pay Gap for Early Childhood Teachers. Retrieved from https://www.ed.gov/news/press-releases/fact-sheet-troubling-pay-gap-early-childhood-teachers

[5] Center for the Study of Child Care Employment, University of California, Berkeley. (2016). Early Childhood Workforce Index 2016: Massachusetts. Retrieved from http://cscce.berkeley.edu/files/2016/Index-2016-Massachusetts.pdf

February 19, 2019
by saadiaahmad001
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Cliff Effects Webinar Draws in Over 250 Listeners From Around the Country

by Caitlin Carey, Doctoral Candidate of Public Policy and Public Affairs

On Tuesday, January 29th, the University of Massachusetts Boston’s Center for Social Policy hosted a webinar called, Cliff Effects: Turning Research into Action for Economic Mobility. The webinar highlighted the latest research on cliff effects from the Center for Social Policy and focused on how research is being deployed for policy and workforce practice.

Center for Social Policy Director Susan Crandall, along with Werby Intern, Magaly Vanessa, Saenz Somaribba, and PPPA doctoral student Caitlin Carey, presented their latest findings on cliff effects in Hampden County, Massachusetts, including an overview of policy solutions.

Michael Cole, Director of Budget and Analytics for the Massachusetts Department of Transitional Assistance, presented on the Learn to Earn Initiative and the CommonCalc Benefits Navigation Tool. With input from a CSP prototype, the Massachusetts Department of Transitional Assistance is developing the CommonCalc Tool in order to better help workforce development providers assist program participants in getting over the benefits cliffs.

Milissa Daniels at Holyoke Community College, one of the five Learn to Earn grants recipients, spoke on the success to date of the medical assisting program. Anne Kandilis, Springfield WORKS/Working Cities Challenge Director, Economic Development Council of Western Mass, shared her findings from the Springfield WORKS initiative in which employers partnered with local workforce development providers ton increase employee retention. She also shared a detailed example of a family facing cliff effects, developed in partnership with the Center for Social Policy, entitled “Christina’s Dilemma.”

Abhidnya Kurve, Policy Associate & Coordinator for the On Solid Ground Coalition, spoke about On Solid Ground, which is cross-sector coalition of families and advocates, with the Center for Social Policy as the lead research partner. She highlighted new legislation to address housing stability and economic mobility for families living in Massachusetts.

According to Crandall, accessible webinars such as this that inform both the public and policymakers are an essential part of the Center for Social Policy’s mission. She commented, “I am thrilled that our Center for Social Policy research on cliff effects is being successfully deployed to develop tools, enhance practice, and influence policy for economic mobility. As an applied research center working at the intersection of employment practice and public policy, it is exactly what we aspire to do.”

July 24, 2018
by saadiaahmad001
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McCormack’s Master of Public Administration Program Earns NASPAA Accreditation

The McCormack Graduate School’s Master of Public Administration program (MPA) is among six new programs earning accreditation by the Network of Schools of Public Policy, Affairs, and Administration (NASPAA). NASPAA accreditation is considered the global standard of excellence for graduate programs in public service disciplines. The MPA program at UMass Boston will appear on the NASPAA Annual Roster of Accredited Programs in conformity with standards established for professional masters degrees in public affairs and administration and maintain accreditation status for seven years, beginning September 1, 2018.

“Our MPA program has been training the government and nonprofit sector workforce in the region for more than three decades.  NASPAA accreditation is a milestone in the history of our program signaling our commitment to advancing knowledge, research, and practice in public service,” said Amy Smith, associate professor and director of the MPA program.  “We are proud to join the roster of more than 200 NASPAA accredited programs from around the globe.”

In addition to earning accreditation, UMass Boston’s MPA program is ranked in the top 100 graduate programs in public affairs by the 2018 U.S. News and World Report Rankings and fourth in Massachusetts.  Known for its cohort model, the MPA program offers evening, weekend, and on-line courses to meet the needs of working professionals.

The UMass Boston MPA program prepares students to contribute to society as leaders, public administrators, policy analysts, and program evaluators in the governmental and nonprofit sectors to advance an efficient and effective public sector; and serve the public good and promote the public value, social justice, and equality in the Greater Boston area, Massachusetts, the United States, and in the global community.

November 2, 2017
by McCormack Speaks
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Detecting Media Bias

by Matt Braman, McCormack Graduate School student

a stack of newspapersWith “fake news” attracting so much attention in the past year, I’ve found myself questioning my own news sources much more often. While I consider this to be a normal response in an unpredictable political climate, it has also led me to consider some of the other, more subtle, ways in which news presentation might misinform us. For example, how biased is our news media currently? And if our media are biased, how does that affect our understanding of current events?

Much of the research in this area finds that while people do frequently detect bias in news reporting, often their conclusions are unsubstantiated (Baum and Groeling, 2008; Lin, Haridakis, & Hanson, 2016). In what has been coined the “hostile media” phenomenon, individuals from completely opposite ends of the political spectrum often perceive bias from the same source, even when it is objectively considered to be “relatively balanced and non-partisan” (Vallone et al., 1985 as cited in Groeling, 2013).  Unsurprisingly, this not only makes detecting bias in the media difficult, but also makes attributing such bias to journalistic intent even more challenging (Baum and Groeling, 2008).  Continue Reading →

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