The Collaborative Institute

Building Connections

December 22, 2011
by The Collaborative Institute for Oceans, Climate and Security (CIOCS)
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Collaborative Institute to Host Global Conference

The 2012 Global Conference on Oceans, Climate and Security Planning Team is pleased to announce a change of venue for the GC’12 (previously known by the acronym GCOCS) scheduled for May 21-23, 2012. To maximize participation in a challenging economic climate, GC’12 will now be hosted at the beautiful facilities of UMASS Boston Campus Center and the adjacent John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum. The Collaborative Institute for Oceans, Climate and Security at UMASS Boston will assume GC’12 administration and management responsibility from Battelle Memorial Institute who ably provided Conference administration to the point of opening registration. We are pleased to acknowledge the continued support of Battelle Memorial Institute as a GC’12 Diamond Sponsor valued supporter. GC’12 registration will open mid-January 2012.  For more information, visit www.gcocs.org.

July 21, 2011
by The Collaborative Institute for Oceans, Climate and Security (CIOCS)
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Climate Change and Human Security

The Collaborative Institute works consistently to identify and make clear the connections between climate change and human security, as well as the impact of climate change on oceans and what that means for human health and security. Likewise, global leaders are speaking and acting to bring these issues to the forefront.

At the 6587. meeting of the Security Council, held on 20 July 2011, in connection with the Council’s consideration of impact of climate change under the item entitled “Maintenance of international peace and security,” the President of the Security Council made a  statement on behalf of the Council that begins:

“The Security Council reaffirms its primary responsibility under the Charter of the United Nations for the maintenance of international peace and security. The Council stresses the importance of establishing strategies of conflict prevention.

The Security Council recognizes the responsibility for sustainable development issues, including climate change, conferred upon the General Assembly and the Economic and Social Council.”

Read the full statement here.

This official statement coincides with statements by Achim Steiner from the UN Environment Programme who stated that climate change would also “exponentially” increase the scale of natural disasters. In addressing the UN Security Council during a debate on the impact of climate change on international security and peace, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon stated that, “Extreme weather events continue to grow more frequent and intense in rich and poor countries alike, not only devastating lives, but also infrastructure, institutions, and budgets – an unholy brew which can create dangerous security vacuums.”

Despite these strong statements from UN officials urging the Security Council to act in response to climate change, not all members of the Council agree including climate change on the Council agenda. According to one report, “US ambassador Susan Rice said Washington strongly believed the council ‘has an essential responsibility to address the clear-cut peace and security implications of a changing climate,’ and should ‘start now.'” The report goes on to state:

“But Russian envoy Alexander Pankin said Moscow was “sceptical” about attempts to put the implications of climate change on the council’s agenda, which is defined as dealing with threats to international peace and security.

‘We believe that involving the security council in a regular review of the issue of climate change will not bring any added value whatsoever and will merely lead to further increased politicisation of this issue and increased disagreements between countries,’ he said.

Western diplomats said Russia’s statement reflected long-standing concerns about security council agenda “creep.””

Should the Security Council investigate the connections between climate change and human security? Would this leader to “increased politicization” or open channels of communication amongst nations?

October 13, 2010
by The Collaborative Institute for Oceans, Climate and Security (CIOCS)
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NCSE Hosts 11th Annual Conference on Science, Policy and the Environment

CIOCS would like to inform you of the following NCSE Conference, at which CIOCS Executive Director Robbin Peach will lead a session on food security. The conference will be January 19-21, 2011, in Washington, DC. Read on or see the Conference Website for more details.

The National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE)’s 11th National Conference on Science, Policy and the Environment: Our Changing Oceans will provide a forum to address the crisis facing our oceans, new knowledge and innovative tools to effectively face this challenge, and the policy and governance needed to restore and protect the oceans.

The conference will bring together over 1,200 scientists, professionals, policy makers, university faculty and students, and educated citizens from a wide range of backgrounds to share their perspectives and develop action-oriented recommendations, new initiatives and other outcomes to improve our stewardship of oceans and their resources.

As a conference attendee, you will be an active participant in developing significant and meaningful outcomes.  You will also enjoy opportunities to network and develop new partnerships and collaborations with a wide array of individuals and institutions at the forefront of connecting science to environmental policy and management. This is a one-of-a kind conference with a devoted following and limited space.

The first day will be devoted to the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill and its aftermath with prominent speakers from government, industry, science, conservation and affected communities. Days two and three will address eight topic areas:

 1. Oceans and Carbon
 2. Coastal Ocean Change and Potential for Adaptation
 3. Oceans and Living Marine Ecosystems
 4. Oceans and Human Health
 5. Oceans Affect Everyone
 6. Tipping Points
 7. White Arctic/Blue Arctic
 8. Observing and Measuring Ocean Changes for Improved Stewardship 

These themes are woven through key note addresses, plenary sessions, symposia and breakout sessions with diverse expert speakers.

See the Conference Website for a detailed agenda and to download the Conference Brochure. Click Here to Register. Reminder: Early Bird Registration Ends October 15, 2010

Waves of Change Ocean Expo
The Waves of Change Expo is a platform to spotlight cutting-edge programs and initiatives on ocean science, conservation and education to a broad range of attendees.  The two-day expo will be held in the Atrium of the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington, DC, January 20-21, 2011. For more info and to sign up, please see the
Waves of Change Ocean Expo page.

Call for Collaborators
Each year, NCSE’s National Conference partners with a diversity of organizations, companies and agencies to extend conference outreach to increasingly broad communities. If you would be interested in collaborating on this level, please fill out the online
Collaborators Application and NCSE will be in touch soon.  

Other Speakers to date:
John Amos, SkyTruth
Don Anderson, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute
Dan Ayers, Former Executive Director of the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustees Council
Reginald Beach, NOAA
Michael Beck, The Nature Conservancy
Linda Birnbaum, National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences
Don Boesch, University of Maryland
Rusty Brainard, NOAA
John Bruno, University of North Carolina
Meg Caldwell, Stanford University
Tracy Collier, NOAA
Rita Colwell, University of Maryland
Sarah Cooley, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute
Robert Corell, Global Environment and Technology Foundation
Rita Curtis, NOAA/OSTP
J. Emmett Duffy, Virginia Institute of Marine Science
Juliet Eilpren, The Washington Post
Kim Loch Fletcher, Abt Associates
Sherri Goodman, Center for Naval Analysis, former Deputy Undersecretary of Defense
Kelly Goodwin, NOAA
Hilary Goodwin, Consortium for Ocean Leadership
Jessica Grannis, Georgetown University
Andrew Gude, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
John Guinotte, Marine Conservation Biology Institute
Carlos Gutierrez, Former Secretary of Commerce and CEO of Kellogg
Lynne Hale, The Nature Conservancy
Lara Hansen, EcoAdapt
Kevin Hassett, American Enterprise Institute
Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, The University of Queensland
Jack Kaye, NASA
Geraldine Knatz, Port of Los Angeles
Nancy Knowlton, Smithsonian Museum of Natural History
Margaret Leinen, Climate Response Fund
Bill Lipscomb, Los Alamos National Lab
Tony MacDonald, Monmouth University
Amber Mace, California Ocean Protection Council
Marcia McNutt, USGS
Tony Michaels, Proteus Environmental Technologies
Ed Miles, University of Washington
Erik Milito, American Petroleum Institute
Lance Morgan, Marine Conservation Biology Institute
Steven Murowski, NOAA Fisheries
Elliott Norse, Marine Conservation Biology Institute
Mary O’Connor, National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis
Edward Overton, Louisiana State University
Robbin Peach, UMass Boston
Charles “Pete” Peterson, University of North Carolina
Steward Pickett, Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies
Andrew Revkin, New York Times
Anthony J. Richardson, CSIRO and Atmospheric Research
Andy Rosenberg, Conservation International
Mary Ruckelshaus, NOAA Fisheries
Stuart Sandin, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Lynn Scarlett, Resources for the Future
Heidi Sosik, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Mark J. Spalding, The Ocean Foundation
James Tripp, Environmental Defense Fund
Juli Trtanj, NOAA
Wes Tunnell, Texas A&M Corpus Christi
Brad Warren, Sustainable Fisheries Partnership
David Yoskowitz, Texas A&M University

 

About the National Council for Science and the Environment
NCSE specializes in programs that bring together diverse individuals, institutions and communities to collaborate. We work closely with the many communities creating and using environmental knowledge to make and shape environmental decisions, including research, education, environmental, and business organizations as well as governmental bodies at all levels.

While an advocate for science and its use, NCSE does not take positions on environmental outcomes. In this sense it is different from traditional environmental groups. As an organization that is strongly focused rooted in the real-world decisionmaking, it is different from traditional scientific organizations. NCSE is motivated above all by a commitment to use science to achieve solutions to the environmental challenges facing humanity.

 

To get more info on events and other news, sign up for the CIOCS listserv by emailing CIOCS@umb.edu.


 

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