McCormack Speaks

March 30, 2020
by jackli001
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UMass Boston Africa Day 2020 – Challenging Pan Africanism through Migrations

By Ojemire Benjamin Daniel, PhD Student, Department of Conflict Resolution, Human Security and Global Governance

Photo of the Organizers in Africa Day 2020

Africa Day 2020 focused on migration within Africa and the challenge of Afrophobia — a form of xenophobia directed by Africans toward other Africans.  Fatima Kyari Mohammed, the African Union ambassador to the United Nations, spoke passionately about the continent’s successes in transcending the issue. Mohammed, the luncheon keynote speaker, said Africans should celebrate their differences and “transform this thinking into positive action.”

This year’s event theme was titled, Challenges to Pan Africanism: Afrophobia and Migration Across Borders” to reflect the African continent’s attempts to achieve integration and unity across its deeply pluralistic and diverse borders in spite of the challenges that mitigate its success. It was hosted by the McCormack Graduate School’s Africa Scholar Forum (ASF) – a campus-wide academic platform for faculty who are teachers or scholars of the study of Africa- and that is chaired by McCormack’s Associate Dean and Professor of international relations, Rita Kiki Edozie. Held on March 6th, with welcoming addresses from Professor Edozie, Interim Chancellor Katherine Newman, Interim Provost Emily McDermott, Vice Chancellor Gail DiSabatino, and Dean David Cash, this year the all-day event was delivered through four components – a keynote plenary African-menu luncheon speaker, a keynote plenary panel of Greater Boston scholars of African Studies, an UMass Boston doctoral student panel, an evening keynote speaker, and a gala evening cultural extravaganza that included an African-inspired fashion show and an Afrobeat DJ.

UMass Boston ASF faculty, Dr. Nada Ali, a senior lecturer in the department of womens, gender, and sexuality studies, and Professor Quito Swan, also William Trotter Institute Director, and other scholars from Harvard, Wellesley, Mount Holyoke, and SUNY Geneseo Wellesley, Mount Holyoke, and SUNY Geneseo  debated the relevance of race and neocolonialism as a factor of Africa’s global migration trends and a spearheading of South African challenges in receiving African migrants. Organized as the Pan African Graduate Student Association(PAGSA), several doctoral students from McCormack Graduate School, the College of Liberal Arts, and the School of Global and Social Inclusion, whose dissertations engage critical topics in African affairs, spoke to these policy issues in relation to the problem of African xenophobia. Evening keynote speaker, Rahman Oladigbolu, a Boston-based, Nigerian filmmaker showed scenes from his film on African immigrants’ experiences in the United States, Soul Sisters.

With luncheon and evening reception food prepared by local Boston Nigerian, Somalian, and Cape Verdes restaurants, and an evening African cultural show; the all-day event marked another successful affair at the UMass Boston campus which hosts a sizeable number of African immigrant, international, and heritage students.

February 27, 2020
by jackli001
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Celebrating and Reflections on Black History Month

By Esther Rogers, MPA student in Department of Public Policy and Public Affairs

Photo of Esther Rogers and KrystalGayle ONeillPhoto of UrbanIntellectuals.com flashcards

McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies hosted its first informal discussion on Celebrating Black History Month on February 26th.

The discussion included personal reflections on what Celebrating Black History means and was enhanced by informational flashcards of known and unknown African Americans and individuals from the African Diaspora and the Caribbean and how they all contributed to our robust history in America and abroad.

The discussions were thoughtful and offered differing perspectives that included: individuals who immigrated to the US and their challenges in facing racism and discrimination, becoming aware of the lack of diversity in their workplaces and on college campuses, ambiguity regarding Black History Month being only one month and the lack of unsung individuals, environmental justice and older adult students’ challenge in accessing their pensions, as well as many other topics.

The consensus among those in attendance was that it was a great opportunity to share their experiences and it was much needed. One key point that came out from the discussion was, as a nation and globally, although we collectively haven’t reached a post racial society, we have made strides, and will continue to make them, toward achieving this goal.

David and Kiki and others will be working on holding these exciting informal discussions on a monthly basis and will be featuring other heritage celebrations throughout the semester.

I want to thank everyone in attendance and look forward to inviting even more voices to the conversation. For those who are interested, the flashcards can be found on UrbanIntellectuals.com.

Until next time, please take care of yourself and each other.

January 31, 2020
by jackli001
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Talking Race, Party Politics, and the 2020 Presidential Election with Harvard Professor and Author Leah Wright Rigueur

By Christopher C. Graham, PhD Candidate in Global Governance and Human Security

Photo of the DOSS Town Hall Event

As we come closer to the US 2020 presidential election, scholars are weighing in on the future of American democracy.

One such scholar is Leah Wright Rigueur, award-winning author and associate professor of at Harvard Kennedy School. Dr. Rigueur was the guest speaker at a recent Public Affairs Networking Reception hosted by the Dean’s Office Student Success Program (DOSS) at the McCormack Graduate School.

Drawing parallels with previous events in American political history, Rigueur’s talk explored how issues of race, political ideology, and party politics factors into the upcoming 2020 presidential election.

Highlighting the growing public discontent with partisan politics in America, Rigueur suggested that one of the main goals for voters is to elect a president capable of unifying the nation. Over the last decade there has been deepening discord between Democrats and Republicans in their policy preferences, social values and levels of tolerance for the other’s political views. Meanwhile in the nation’s capital, Congress remains deeply divided. Policymaking has strictly been along party lines. As a result, stalemate ensues on issues important to the American public, such as gun control, the environment and immigration.

On matters of race, the upcoming presidential election is a pivotal moment for institutional reform. The political landscape, dominated by two major political parties, has created an environment where both the Republican and Democratic parties are engaged in a zero-sum game that seldom benefits racial minority voters.

Rigueur explained that minority voters were looking to elect a president who was committed to reform aspects of the political party system. For example, neither of the two political parties seems to be providing the type of political leadership needed to address issues important to the African American community. These issues include voter suppression, criminal justice reform, generational wealth gaps, increasing student loan debt, gentrification and civil rights enforcement.

Rigueur identified voter suppression as one of the most concerning issues for racial minority communities. Since 2010 voting restrictions have tightened in over two dozen states. These restrictions include new voter identification laws and reduced ballot-casting locations. And more recently, the use of social media and other technologies to exploit racial tensions, spread misinformation, and suppress minority voters. Citing increasing reports of these strategies to prevent minority groups from voting, Rigueur called for more resolute political leadership on this issue.

Even with the presidential election less than a year away, and with voters mere weeks from casting the first votes in the Democratic primary, many of these issues remain unaddressed by Democratic presidential candidates on the campaign trail or Republican leaders. Rigueur, like many Americans, remains vigilant in holding political leaders accountable to upholding the values of American democracy.

In her closing remarks, Rigueur offered career advice to graduate students in attendance at the reception, encouraging students to remain committed to their vision for a better world. Many of McCormack’s students plan to pursue careers in public administration, the non-profit sector, international politics and academia, saying they will use their research, expertise and community engagement skills to make positive changes wherever they are needed.

Since its inception two years ago, the Dean’s Office Student Success Program has provided an action-oriented student success platform that deepens, complements, and enhances graduate student support initiatives. The DOSS program continues to cultivate a community of educational and career relationships that build professional competencies for students at the McCormack Graduate School.

The program facilitates student success from recruitment to degree completion and successful post-graduation placement. Engaging with scholars, community leaders and activists like Dr. Rigueur provides students with examples of the excellence that they should aspire to and the impact that they can make in the world.


Christopher C. Graham is the Program Assistant for DOSS. He is also a Fellow at the Center for Peace Democracy and Development, a Fulbright Scholar 2014-16 and a Doctoral Candidate at the McCormack Graduate School.

May 15, 2019
by saadiaahmad001
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Massachusetts Expands Protections and Rights for LGBT Groups

by Michael DiFranza, MPA student

Massachusetts has long been ahead of the curve in providing rights and protections for LGBT people compared to other states. In 2004 Massachusetts became the first state to recognize same-sex marriage.[1] Recently several new laws have been passed to extend protections in the state.

This April, MA legislature banned ‘ex-gay’ conversion therapy for youths. Conversion therapy is a practice that is aimed at changing an individual’s sexual orientation or gender identity. This practice is widely rejected by most major medical and psychological institutions like the World Health Organization, the American Psychological Association, and the American Medical Association. Conversion therapy is dangerous, because it can be a psychologically traumatic experience for LGBT youths. This bill passed with bipartisan support and went into effect on April 8th.[2]

On April 25th the MA legislature passed a bill that legally allows individuals to change the sex designation on their birth record. Individuals are not limited to “female” and “male,” but are also given the option to designate as “X,” which would indicate that they do not identify as the other two options; they are another gender, or an undesignated gender. There is no requirement for health-care and medical-related documentation or a proof of name change.

Some states, such as Alabama, allow you to change your sex designation on your birth certificate only after you under-go sex reassignment surgery and legally change your name.[3] The individual, or their guardian, if they are a minor, must provide an affidavit under the penalty of perjury that the person is changing their designation to conform to their gender identity, and not for fraudulent reasons.

Driver’s licenses, learners permits, ID cards, and liquor licenses will now reflect changes in sex designation, with the “X” designation now an option on these forms of ID in Massachusetts. Plans are being put in place to change all forms of documentation issued by state agencies to include the “X” designation for gender. This bill will take effect on January 1, 2020.[4]

In 2016, MA Ballot Question 3 upheld civil rights protections for LGBT people. This prohibited discrimination based on gender identity.[5] Massachusetts had to provide these protections because currently federal civil rights laws do not. Most of the states in the U.S. do not extend protections to transgendered people. This means in large portions of the U.S. someone can be fired from a job, evicted from a home, or refused service at a business based on their gender identity.[6] Extending protections at the federal level will be critical in preventing discrimination against LGBT groups in the future. Until then state level protections must become more comprehensive in order to compensate for the lack of federal protections.

[1] “HILLARY GOODRIDGE & Others vs. DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH & Another.” GOODRIDGE vs. DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 440 Mass. 309, 2003, masscases.com/cases/sjc/440/440mass309.html.

[2] Johnson, Chris. “Massachusetts Becomes 16th State to Ban ‘Ex-Gay’ Therapy for Youth.” Washington Blade: Gay News, Politics, LGBT Rights, 8 Apr. 2019, www.washingtonblade.com/2019/04/08/massachusetts-becomes-16th-state-to-ban-ex-gay-therapy-for-youth/.

[3] Ala. Code § 22-9A-19(d) (2004).

[4] “Bill S.2213 An Act Relative to Gender Identity on Massachusetts Identification.” Bill S.2213, 25 Apr. 2019, malegislature.gov/Bills/191/S2213.

[5] Galivn, William Francis. “2018 Information For Voters.” Elections: 2018 Information For Voters, 2019, www.sec.state.ma.us/ele/ele18/ballot_questions_18/quest_3.htm.

[6] Human Rights Campaign. “State Maps of Laws and Policies.” Human Rights Campaign, 2019, www.hrc.org/state-maps

May 15, 2019
by saadiaahmad001
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An Act to Protect the Commonwealth from Dangerous Persons

by Jessica Lambert, MPA student

On January 15, Governor Baker re-filed An Act to Protect the Commonwealth from Dangerous Persons. This legislation was in response to the tragic police officer deaths of Yarmouth Police Officer Sean Gannon and Weymouth Police Officer Michael Chesna. Both of these officers were killed by offenders with prior criminal records, one of whom had a long history of violence. These officers’ lives would have been spared, if Massachusetts had already adopted proper criminal justice legislation with regards to dangerous individuals.

The proposed bill includes provisions impacting our current criminal justice and courts system. It empowers law enforcement and judges to make better informed decisions with regards to withholding bail for certain individuals who have a prior history of dangerous and illegal behavior. This legislation would address the fact that in Massachusetts, “prosecutors are permitted to ask a judge to hold a defendant because of the danger the defendant poses to the community only in a limited number of cases, and under a set of procedures that do not provide the district attorneys or the courts with the information they need to make fully informed decisions” (Baker, 2018). This ties law enforcement’s hands behind their backs. District attorneys and judges are only allowed to hold individuals on the basis of dangerousness to the community in certain cases and without a full criminal history.

The Baker-Polito administration put forth a number of common sense policies to reform these processes. With regards to the court system, “this legislation expands the list of offenses which can provide grounds for a dangerousness hearing, and it also follows the long-standing federal model in including a defendant’s history of serious criminal convictions as grounds that may warrant a dangerousness hearing (Baker, 2018).” It essentially allows for the court to have all the information on a defendant when deciding whether or not that individual should be released on bail. This legislation will stop dangerous individuals from re-entering society when they are a danger to their communities. “It also ensures that a person who a court determines is a danger or who violates his or her conditions of release is held until the time of trial or other disposition of the case, rather than being released after a defined period (Baker, 2018).” This will ensure that dangerous individuals are held indefinitely until they can be given a fair trial so that they don’t hurt anyone else in the interim.

With regards to law enforcement, this bill also gives the police a more concrete way to deal with probation violations and with individuals who commit felonies. For example, allowing the police to act on and arrest “a person who they observe violating a condition of release (Baker, 2018).” Under current law, police are not allowed to do this, and officers essentially watch as criminals continually violate the pre-conditions of their release without being able to take action Additionally, the legislation, “extends the requirement that police take the fingerprints of people arrested for felonies to all people arrested, regardless of the charge, to ensure that decisions about release can be made with knowledge of a person’s true identity and full criminal history (Baker, 2018).” This allows law enforcement to make sure that they have the full history of a person who commits a felony to determine whether or not they are a danger to the community.

I would argue that this legislation offers common sense policies to protect the people and first-responders of the Commonwealth from dangerous individuals. Just a small amount of justice for the Gannon and Chesna families.

References

Baker, C. (2018). An Act to Protect the Commonwealth from Dangerous Persons. https://www.mass.gov/files/documents/2018/09/06/Dangerous%20Persons%20Letter%20and%20Bill%20Text.pdf

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