University Archives & Special Collections launches Instagram account

University Archives & Special Collections is excited to announce that we have recently launched an Instagram account. We are regularly sharing selections from our archival and manuscript collections, rare books, historic UMass Boston photographs, and Mass. Memories Road Show images. Recent topics include the construction of UMass Boston’s campus on Columbia Point, the failed search for Arctic explorer John Franklin’s written records, and the Roman mausoleum and fortress Castel Sant’Angelo. Follow us at @umbarchives to join the fun! Browse a sample of our posts below.

Construction on Columbia Point campus, early 1970s The House Beautiful by Clarence Cook Sir Allen William Young's ship the Pandora
Melanges de poesie et de litterature. Par M. de Florian. Satires de Dulorens The hyacinth or affection's gift : a Christmas, New Year, and birth-day present, for 1853
UMass Boston chorus performing at the university's original campus in Park Square photo of Castel Sant'Angelo from an 1882 album compiled by Fanny Sedgewick Pomeroy 1927 reprint of Martin Luther's 1545 German translation of the Bible

 


University Archives & Special Collections in the Joseph P. Healey Library at UMass Boston collects materials related to the university’s history, as well as materials that reflect the institution’s urban mission and strong support of community service, notably in collections of records of urban planning, social welfare, social action, alternative movements, community organizations, and local history related to neighboring communities.

University Archives & Special Collections welcomes inquiries from individuals, organizations, and businesses interested in donating materials of an archival nature that that fit within our collecting policy. These include manuscripts, documents, organizational archives, collections of photographs, unique publications, and audio and video media. For more information about donating to University Archives & Special Collections, click here or email library.archives@umb.edu.

 

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Happy National Poetry Day! Explore the Cid Corman collection of poetry, translations, and edited works

corman_no-less

Corman, Cid. no less. Elizabeth Press, 1968.

In celebration of National Poetry Day, we’re highlighting our collection of works by local poet Cid Corman. Cid Corman was born in 1934 in Roxbury, Massachusetts, and grew up in Dorchester. He graduated from Tufts University in 1941 and did graduate work at the University of Michigan, the University of North Carolina, and the Sorbonne.

A prolific poet, editor, and translator, Corman was the owner of the Origin Press, and he edited and published Origin magazine. While living in Boston he worked to promote the poetry community through events and a radio program. He moved to Japan in the late 1950s and continued to edit Origin, write poetry, and translate Japanese works. He died in 2004.

This collection in University Archives and Special Collections at UMass Boston consists of volumes of poetry written by Cid Corman, volumes of poetry written by other authors that were edited or translated by Corman, and two series of the periodical Origins, edited by Corman. In addition to the cataloged monographs and serials, the collection contains a small number of broadsides, publicity material, and miscellaneous publications.

Snow drips
into
snow drifts

What less
than this
than this

Rain falls —
nothing else
to say —
but say it

In cylin-
drical
rainwater

azalea
petals:
help
yourself

-Excerpt from no less by Cid Corman, 1968.

View the finding aid for the Cid Corman collection here.

For questions about this collection or to schedule a research appointment, please contact library.archives@umb.edu or 617-287-5469.


University Archives & Special Collections in the Joseph P. Healey Library at UMass Boston collects materials related to the university’s history, as well as materials that reflect the institution’s urban mission and strong support of community service, notably in collections of records of urban planning, social welfare, social action, alternative movements, community organizations, and local history related to neighboring communities.

University Archives & Special Collections welcomes inquiries from individuals, organizations, and businesses interested in donating materials of an archival nature that that fit within our collecting policy. These include manuscripts, documents, organizational archives, collections of photographs, unique publications, and audio and video media. For more information about donating to University Archives & Special Collections, click here or email library.archives@umb.edu.

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Join us on October 5 for #AskAnArchivist Day!

l_edward_lashman_jr_writing_on_chalkboardOn Wednesday, October 5, archivists around the country will take to Twitter to answer your questions about any and all things related to archives. This day-long event, sponsored by the Society of American Archivists, will give you the opportunity to connect directly with archivists in your community—and around the country—to ask questions, get information, or just satisfy your curiosity.

To participate, all you need is a Twitter account. Log in and pose questions to the archives community, or tweet directly at an archivist at UMass Boston using our handle @UMB_Archives. Be sure to include the hashtag #AskAnArchivist in your tweets!

We will be closely monitoring our Twitter account all day on October 5 and will happily answer any questions that you send our way. Do you have a specific question about one of our collections? Do you need help locating materials for your research? Is there something you’ve been longing to know about archives in general? Well, now is your chance to ask us!

If you’re not able to participate in #AskAnArchivist Day, you’re also more than welcome to email us at library.archives@umb.edu with any questions that you might have. We would love to hear from you!

Read the Society of American Archivists’ news release about #AskAnArchivist Day here.

Note: The above photograph is an edited and Photoshopped version of an image from our University Archives. The image shows L. Edward Lashman, Jr., a former vice president of development for the University of Massachusetts Boston, writing on chalkboard. View the unedited image here.


University Archives & Special Collections in the Joseph P. Healey Library at UMass Boston collects materials related to the university’s history, as well as materials that reflect the institution’s urban mission and strong support of community service, notably in collections of records of urban planning, social welfare, social action, alternative movements, community organizations, and local history related to neighboring communities.

University Archives & Special Collections welcomes inquiries from individuals, organizations, and businesses interested in donating materials of an archival nature that that fit within our collecting policy. These include manuscripts, documents, organizational archives, collections of photographs, unique publications, and audio and video media. For more information about donating to University Archives & Special Collections, click here or email library.archives@umb.edu.

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In the Archives: Eagle Forward, Newspaper of the 24th Infantry Regiment

First issue of Eagle Forward. Originally titled Eagle's Flight. September 14, 1950.

First issue of Eagle Forward. Originally titled Eagle’s Flight. September 14, 1950.

The 24th Infantry Regiment was one of the last segregated units in the United States Army. It was formed in 1869 by consolidating the 38th and 41st Colored Infantry Regiments, and all of its enlisted soldiers were African-American. The regiment was engaged in a number of military conflicts and wars throughout its history, including the Spanish-American War, the Philippine-American War, World War II, and the Korean War. It was disbanded in 1951, and then re-instituted in 1995, and served in the Iraq War from 2004-2005. For a useful history of the 24th Infantry Regiment, see Black Soldier, White Army: The 24th Infantry Regiment in Korea, published by the United States Army Center of Military History.

During the Korean War, the regiment published Eagle Forward (originally called Eagle’s Flight in its first issue), a two-page newspaper known as a “foxhole daily,” which had a circulation of about 600 copies which were distributed to soldiers in the Army. From September 1950 until September 1951, Eagle Forward published news items from the Armed Forces Radio Services, the Armed Forces Press Services, the Associated Press (AP), the United Press (UP), and the International News Service (INS). The paper also ran stories about individual soldiers and companies, advice columns, cartoons, and humorous items. AP journalist Hal Boyle wrote of Eagle Forward, “[It was] put out by candlelight, Korean gaslight and flashlight. It has gone to press in bombed-out buildings, abandoned factories, in open fields, in tents and in creek beds… [I]ts editors sometimes have to melt the frozen ink on the stove to publish, but no difficulty yet has stopped them.”

SC-0120_f6_001

Newspaper article on Quentin Chavous. [Columbus Dispatch, 1951.]

Quentin Chavous was a member of the 24th Infantry Regiment and served as editor of the newspaper from May-September 1951. Chavous later joined the faculty of the Africana Studies Department at UMass Boston, and donated a nearly complete run of Eagle Forward to University Archives & Special Collections in 2006. In addition to issues of the newspaper, the collection also includes Army reports and news clippings on Eagle Forward and Chavous. The entire collection has been digitized and is available on UASC’s website here.

View the finding aid for this collection here.

For questions about this collection or to schedule a research appointment, please contact library.archives@umb.edu or 617-287-5469.


University Archives & Special Collections in the Joseph P. Healey Library at UMass Boston collects materials related to the university’s history, as well as materials that reflect the institution’s urban mission and strong support of community service, notably in collections of records of urban planning, social welfare, social action, alternative movements, community organizations, and local history related to neighboring communities.

University Archives & Special Collections welcomes inquiries from individuals, organizations, and businesses interested in donating materials of an archival nature that that fit within our collecting policy. These include manuscripts, documents, organizational archives, collections of photographs, unique publications, and audio and video media. For more information about donating to University Archives & Special Collections, click here or email library.archives@umb.edu.

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In the Archives: Women’s Studies Program Records

Women's Studies course listing brochure, 1981-1982.

Women’s Studies course listing brochure, 1981-1982.

Women’s Studies emerged in the U.S. in the 1960s and 1970s as a national curriculum and higher education institutional reform movement that addressed issues of gender bias, gender inequality, and sexism in the academic canon and society at large. One of the first Women’s Studies programs in New England was founded at UMass Boston. In the late 1960s, UMass Boston students, faculty, and staff organized a Women’s Association that addressed a variety of feminist issues.

International Women's Day reception flyer, March 1983.

International Women’s Day reception flyer, March 1983.

Faculty in the humanities and social sciences developed courses focused on women and gender. In 1972, a student-faculty committee proposed a Women’s Studies concentration, and the group gathered hundreds of signatures in support of this proposal on a petition to the University Assembly and UMass Boston administration. In 1973, the proposal was approved, and in the fall of that year, the 18-credit interdisciplinary concentration was official.

Over the years, the Women’s Studies faculty at UMass Boston grew, and a bachelor’s degree in Women’s Studies was proposed in the late 1980s. Chancellor Sherry H. Penney championed the B.A. program during her first year at UMass Boston in 1988, and the program was approved by the Board of Regents in 1989. That fall, Women’s Studies offered a major and minor, but remained as a “program” in order to encourage faculty across disciplines to participate in curriculum development and teaching. The program became a department in 2006, and is now the Women’s and Gender Studies Department.

Founding program faculty members Ann Froines and Jean Humez, circa 1998.

Founding program faculty members Ann Froines and Jean Humez, undated.

From the 25th anniversary commemorative booklet, Women’s Studies at UMass Boston Celebrates 25 Years, 1973-1998, a note from Program Director Jean Humez:

The program has grown and evolved in many ways in this quarter century. We grew to five full-time faculty lines; we evolved from a concentration into a full-fledged academic major (with a minor); and we have continued to develop our curriculum in response to new student and faculty interests (always constrained by resource realities, of course!). Through all the changes, we have remained dedicated to the best goals of feminist education, still enunciated in our handbook:
• To bring the history and critical perspectives of women of different cultures, races, and social classes into the university curriculum;
• To stimulate and support new, nonsexist research and writing on women and gender by students and faculty;
• To help promote a nonsexist university environment.

Women's Studies newsletter, 1981.

Women’s Studies newsletter, 1981.

University Archives & Special Collections holds the records of the Women’s Studies Program from 1972-2006. The records document the program’s governance and growth, including faculty appointments and student enrollment; curriculum development; and special projects and associated organizational work. Formats include proposals, by-laws, meeting minutes, budget information, correspondence, curricular materials, and publications.

View the finding aid for the Women’s Studies Program records here. Browse publications by the Women’s and Gender Studies Department here.

For questions about this collection or to schedule a research appointment, please contact library.archives@umb.edu or 617-287-5469.


University Archives & Special Collections in the Joseph P. Healey Library at UMass Boston collects materials related to the university’s history, as well as materials that reflect the institution’s urban mission and strong support of community service, notably in collections of records of urban planning, social welfare, social action, alternative movements, community organizations, and local history related to neighboring communities.

University Archives & Special Collections welcomes inquiries from individuals, organizations, and businesses interested in donating materials of an archival nature that that fit within our collecting policy. These include manuscripts, documents, organizational archives, collections of photographs, unique publications, and audio and video media. For more information about donating to University Archives & Special Collections, click here or email library.archives@umb.edu.

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